Departmental Performance Report 2015-16

Message from the Commissioner of Official Languages of Canada

Graham Fraser

I am pleased to present our 2015-16 Departmental Performance Report,in which you will find a summary of the accomplishments of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for this past fiscal year.

The 2015–16 fiscal year was marked by preparations for the transition to a new commissioner. There were high points, such as the Pan American and Parapan American Games in Toronto, as well as disappointments, such as the reversal of the Federal Court’s decision in our difference of opinion with CBC/Radio-Canada regarding my jurisdiction, and the Supreme Court’s decision in Caron concerning the historical place of French in Western Canada.

In all our interventions before the courts, as well as in my speeches, investigation reports and discussions with federal institutions, the Office of the Commissioner’s primary message has remained constant: English and French are both Canadian languages that belong to everyone and that enjoy equal status in the federal government.

The Office of the Commissioner continues to be active on the web: Canadians and federal institutions can consult our reports and order tools through our website, and participate in discussions via our social media accounts. However, direct contact with citizens continues to hold an important place. For example, we made 60 presentations in schools on linguistic duality and language rights. Together with the French Language Services Commissioner of Ontario, my staff met with nearly 10,000 Canadians and foreign visitors during the Pan Am Games, from July 10 to 26, 2015, in Toronto, and 1,500 at the Parapan Am Games from August 7 to 15, 2015, to raise awareness of the role of our two official languages in Canadian society.

During the upcoming fiscal year, we will see the arrival of a new commissioner and the beginning of the celebrations commemorating the 150th anniversary of Confederation. I would like to take this opportunity to wish my successor the very best. And, I sincerely hope that these celebrations will provide many opportunities to showcase the importance of linguistic duality as a fundamental characteristic of the Canadian identity.

Graham Fraser

Results Highlights

What funds were used?

$20,230,031

Actual Spending

Who was involved

161

Actual FTEs

Results Highlights

  • Commissioner Fraser prepared his last annual report, which included highlights of a study on active offer in the federal public service.
  • The Office of the Commissioner issued report cards for 33 federal institutions and conducted a horizontal analysis of the results.
  • The Office of the Commissioner prepared a special report to Parliament proposing options to strengthen Air Canada’s official languages enforcement scheme.
  • The Office of the Commissioner developed and promoted the Guide for Major Events (2014) with key stakeholders so large-scale events reflect Canada’s linguistic duality.
  • The Office of the Commissioner developed an overview of the Commissioner’s role before the courts over the past 10 years.

Section I: Organizational Overview

Organizational Profile

Commissioner
Graham Fraser
Year established
1970
Main legislative authorities
Subsection 56(1) of the Official Languages Act
Other
The Commissioner of Official Languages is appointed by commission under the Great Seal, after approval by resolution of the House of Commons and the Senate. The Commissioner of Official Languages reports directly to Parliament.

Organizational Context

Raison d’être

The mandate of the Commissioner of Official Languages is to oversee the full implementation of the Official Languages Act,protect the language rights of Canadians, and promote linguistic duality and bilingualism in Canada.

The President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada is responsible for tabling the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ (OCOL’s) administrative reports in Parliament, including the Report on Plans and Priorities and the Departmental Performance Report.

Responsibilities

Section 56 of the Official Languages Act states:

It is the duty of the Commissioner to take all actions and measures within the authority of the Commissioner with a view to ensuring recognition of the status of each of the official languages and compliance with the spirit and intent of this Act in the administration of the affairs of federal institutions, including any of their activities relating to the advancement of English and French in Canadian society.

Under the Act, therefore, the Commissioner is required to take every measure within his power to ensure that the three main objectives of the Official Languages Act are met:

  • the equality of the status and use of English and French in Parliament, the Government of Canada, the federal administration and the institutions subject to the Act;
  • the development of official language communities in Canada; and
  • the advancement of the equality of English and French in Canadian society.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

  • 1. Strategic Outcome:Rights guaranteed by the Official Languages Act are protected and linguistic duality is promoted as a fundamental value of Canadian society.
    • 1.1 Program: Protection of Language Rights
    • 1.2 Program: Promotion of Linguistic Duality
    • Internal Services

Operating Environment and Risk Analysis

The 2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities sets out two strategic risks likely to affect OCOL’s performance during this fiscal year. The table below presents these risks and the response strategy or mitigation measures planned for each of them.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Capacity

Risk to OCOL’s capacity to meet the expectations of parliamentarians, federal institutions and the public.

As part of its strategic planning, OCOL has initiated a strategic review of all its activities and their contribution to the organization’s mandate.

OCOL has reviewed its client request reception process to leverage the new case management system.

OCOL has further advanced the implementation of the Integrated Enterprise Management System, to provide better case management tools. A variety of solutions have been implemented, and the case management solution for investigations will be released in 2016-17.

This risk is link to OCOL’s Strategic Outcome:

Rights guaranteed by the Official Languages Act are protected and linguistic duality is promoted as a fundamental value of Canadian society.

Pertinence

 

Risk to the relevance of the Commissioner’s interventions and his powers of influence.

To develop a productive dialogue with key stakeholders in Quebec on issues relevant to the English-speaking minority, meetings were organized to discuss various files, such as emerging priorities in language policy and the challenges of enforcing the Official Languages Act.

Particular attention was paid to following up on recommendations made in the course of investigations.

Service standards and criteria were reviewed to ensure that investigation responses are pertinent.

This risk is link to OCOL’s Strategic Outcome:

Rights guaranteed by the Official Languages Act are protected and linguistic duality is promoted as a fundamental value of Canadian society.

Organizational Priorities

In the 2015–16 Report on Plans and Priorities,OCOL identified four organizational priorities on which significant progress needed to be made during the fiscal year in order to fully support OCOL’s strategic outcome.

1. Increase recognition of linguistic duality

Description

OCOL must encourage the government and chief official languages stakeholders to take the necessary steps to promote linguistic duality in Canadian society. This is especially relevant in view of Canada’s upcoming 150th anniversary celebrations.

Priority TypeFootnote 1

Previously committed to

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Program(s)
Persuade key decision makers to make linguistic duality an integral part of Canada’s 150th anniversary celebrations in 2017. April 1, 2015 2017 This initiative is on track and will continue in 2016-17 This priority is linked to OCOL’s Strategic Outcome: Rights guaranteed by the Official Languages Act are protected and linguistic duality is promoted as a fundamental value of Canadian society.
Take on a leadership role with language ombudsmen. April 1, 2015 To be determined This initiative is on track and will continue in 2016-17
Progress Toward the Priority

OCOL:

  • met with over 10,000 Canadians and foreign visitors during the Pan Am and Parapan Am Games in Toronto to raise awareness of the role of the two official languages in Canadian society;
  • began developing a strategy for the festivities surrounding the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation; the purpose of this strategy is to identify opportunities for OCOL and the new commissioner to showcase linguistic duality and official languages;
  • participated in a number of meetings to raise awareness among project organizers and various stakeholders of the importance of linguistic duality in planning Canada 150 events and activities, in particular by presenting Celebrating Canada—A Guide to a Successful Bilingual Event to the Department of Canadian Heritage, which sent it to recipients of Canada 150 financial contributions;
  • made 60 presentations in schools across the country to promote linguistic duality among Francophone and immersion students;
  • participated in the annual meeting of the International Association of Language Commissioners in Ireland, where the Commissioner presented best practices and passed the torch to Meri Huws, Welsh Language Commissioner and new chair of the Association;
  • worked together with provincial commissioners and French-language services offices to renew collaboration agreements with the New Brunswick and Ontario commissioners; and
  • met with partners, such as the Department of Justice Canada, the Canadian Bar Association’s Forum of French Speaking Common Law Members, the Official Languages and Bilingualism Institute and the Fédération des associations de juristes d’expression française de common law, to organize a symposium on 150 years of legislative and judicial bilingualism.

2. Identify solutions to recurring compliance issues.

Description

To resolve recurring problems with compliance and ensure respect for Canadians’ language rights, OCOL must adopt a broader, holistic approach that takes the systemic nature of the problem into account.

Priority Type

New

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Develop a strategy to address the issue of active offer and services of equal quality in English and French in the provision of services to the public.

April 1, 2015 March 31, 2017 This initiative is on track and will continue in 2016-17 This priority is linked to OCOL’s Strategic Outcome: Rights guaranteed by the Official Languages Act are protected and linguistic duality is promoted as a fundamental value of Canadian society.
Prepare a report on compliance with the Act and on the impact of the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts covering the 10-year period from 2006 to 2016. April 1, 2015 March 31, 2017 The analysis is completed and the report will be published in 2016-17
Progress Toward the Priority

OCOL:

  • prepared a special report to Parliament proposing options for strengthening the enforcement scheme for Air Canada in relation to official languages;
  • released a report that provided an overview of the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts over the past 10 years;
  • conducted a study on active offer, the highlights of which were included in the 2015-16 annual report;
  • created tools and held workshops to strengthen public servants’ capacity to chair bilingual meetings;
  • organized sessions in Quebec on language of work in cooperation with the Canada School of Public Service and various interdepartmental networks;
  • conducted an audit of the Canada Border Services Agency, which resulted in recommendations being issued for the institution to address the systemic issues brought to light by a complaint regarding service delivery;
  • conducted an audit of Elections Canada, which resulted in recommendations being issued for the institution to address systemic issues arising during general elections;
  • issued report cards for 33 institutions and conducted a horizontal analysis of the results, which were published alongside the 2015-16 annual report.

3. Intervene in key areas to support the vitality of official language minority communities.

Description

In order for official language minority communities to continue to grow and develop, federal institutions must act in areas that have an impact on the communities’ vitality, specifically immigration, access to justice and early childhood development. OCOL will need to encourage federal institutions to take such action, pursuant to Part VII of the Act.

Priority Type

Previously committed to

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Continue implementing OCOL’s intervention strategies on immigration for official language minority communities in collaboration with key partners.

April 1, 2015 March 31, 2016 Completed This priority is linked to OCOL’s Strategic Outcome: Rights guaranteed by the Official Languages Act are protected and linguistic duality is promoted as a fundamental value of Canadian society.
Monitor the implementation of the recommendations in the study on the bilingual capacity of the superior court judiciary, and intervene as necessary. April 1, 2015 March 31, 2017 This initiative is on track and will continue in 2016-17
Work with key partners to develop an intervention strategy in the area of early childhood development. April 1, 2015 October 2016 This initiative is on track and will continue in 2016-17
Progress Toward the Priority

OCOL:

  • maintained an ongoing and effective dialogue with representatives of the Official Languages Secretariat at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada in order to:
    • follow up on the recommendations made in the report on immigration to Francophone minority communities (2014);
    • follow up on the recommendations made in the 2014-15 annual report regarding Anglophone immigration to Quebec; and
    • discuss measures to support the development of the two official language minority communities through immigration;
  • sat on the organizing committee of the 10th Journée de réflexion sur l’immigration francophone, an initiative of the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada (FCFA), and presented a round table on activities and practices for collaboration between the federal and provincial governments to promote immigration to Francophone minority communities;
  • held sessions on Francophone immigration in Winnipeg and Regina to bring together key stakeholders to examine the current and future Francophone immigration situation in Manitoba and Saskatchewan;
  • organized a round table as part of National Francophone Immigration Week in cooperation with the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 and the Société Nationale de l’Acadie;
  • consulted various representatives of federal institutions and community stakeholders as part of its strategy to support early childhood development in official language minority communities in order to produce a report that will be published in 2016; and
  • consulted the English-speaking community and conducted an internal analysis of the options for intervention regarding Bill 86 on the elimination of school board elections in Quebec.

4. Manage change while enabling a productive workforce and fostering a healthy work environment.

Description

In these times of budgetary constraints, it is critical to explore ways to improve service delivery and equip staff to be as productive as possible. As the end of Commissioner Fraser’s second mandate approaches, OCOL is starting to plan for the successful transition to his successor.

Priority Type

Previously committed to

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Status Link to the Organization’s Program(s)

Transform and optimize business processes.

April 1, 2015 March 31, 2017 Several activities that are part of this initiative were completed while others will continue in 2016-17 This priority is linked to Internal Services.
Prepare for the transition to a new commissioner. April 1, 2015 2016-17 This initiative is on track and will continue in 2016-17
Progress Toward the Priority

OCOL:

  • modernized its operational reports and processes and implemented its green procurement plan;
  • made improvements to its computer network in order to provide wireless services in all its regional offices as of the beginning of the 2016-17 fiscal year and to be able to renew its video conferencing and telepresence platform;
  • deployed information technology solutions for requests for legal opinions and for report cards, while making significant progress toward modernizing the investigation management solution, which is expected to be in production by the beginning of 2016-17;
  • improved quality control management with the implementation of the MultiTrans system, which is now in place with the Communications team and is expected to be rolled out to the rest of the organization in the fall of 2016; and
  • developed a strategy to prepare for the arrival of a new commissioner and implemented an action plan so that all information is complete and up to date in order to ensure continuity during the transition.

Section II: Expenditure Overview

Actual Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending
(authorities used)
Difference
(actual minus planned)
20,833,525 20,833,525 21,018,409 20,230,031 (603,494)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents[FTEs])
2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
160 161 1

Actual spending in 2015-16 is lower than planned spending by $0.6 million. This is mainly due to a decrease in salary expenses related to a higher than normal turnover rate which resulted in vacant positions and delays in staffing processes.

Budgetary Performance Summary

Budgetary Performance Summary for Program(s) and Internal Services (dollars)
Program(s) and Internal Services 2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2014–15
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2013–14
Actual Spending (authorities used)
Program 1.1: Protection of Language Rights 6,959,977 6,959,977 6,967,574 6,967,574 6,931,248 6,673,506 7,134,848 6,527,651
Program 1.2: Promotion of Linguistic Duality 6,902,349 6,902,349 6,971,568 6,971,568 6,811,745 6,059,233 7,007,231 7,033,889
Internal Services 6,971,199 6,971,199 6,952,477 6,952,477 7,275,416 7,497,292 8,273,795 10,626,223
Total 20,833,525 20,833,525 20,891,619 20,891,619 21,018,409 20,230,031 22,415,874 24,187,763

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
Sunset programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory 2,346,062 2,349,834 2,115,940 2,332,217 2,332,217 2,332,217
Voted 21,841,701 20,066,040 18,114,091 18,559,402 18,559,402 18,559,402
Total 24,187,763 22,415,874 20,230,031 20,891,619 20,891,619 20,891,619

Actual spending has decreased from 2013-14 to 2015-16 mainly due to the following:

  • the relocation of the headquarters to a new building at 30 Victoria Street in Gatineau that occurred in 2013-14, for which OCOL received one-time funding of $2.8 million in 2013-14; and
  • the implementation of arrears payments for salaries in May 2014, which resulted in the use of additional spending authorities.

Expenditures by Vote

For information on OCOL’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2016.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015-16 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)

Alignment of 2014-15 Actual Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015-16 Actual Spending
1.1: Protection of Language Rights Government Affairs A transparent, accountable, and responsive federal government. 6,673,506
1.2: Promotion of Linguistic Duality Government Affairs A transparent, accountable, and responsive federal government. 6,059,233
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 0 0
Social Affairs 0 0
International Affairs 0 0
Government Affairs 13,862,326 12,732,739

Financial Statements and Financial Statements Highlights

Financial Statements

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2016 (dollars)
Financial Information 2015–16 Planned Results 2015–16 Actual 2014–15 Actual Difference
(2015–16 actual minus 2015–16 planned)
Difference
(2015–16 actual minus 2014–15 actual)
Total expenses 23,746,523 23,245,665 24,572,906 (500,858) (1,327,241)
Total revenues 0 0 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 23,746,523 23,245,665 24,572,906 (500,858) (1,327,241)

Compared with the previous fiscal year, total expenses decreased by $1,327,241 or 5%, which is mainly attributable to a $1,339,457 decrease in salaries due to vacant positions and staffing delays.

Expense Breakdown for fiscal year 2015-16 (total: $23.2 Million)
Salaries and employee benefits: $16.8 Million Professional and special services: $2.9 Million Accommodation: $1.7 Million Transportation and telecommunications: $0.5 Million Other Expenses: $1.3 Million
Percentages 72% 13% 7% 2% 6%
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2016 (dollars)
Financial Information 2015–16 2014–15 Difference
(2015–16 minus 2014–15)
Total net liabilities 3,247,452 3,635,872 (388,420)
Total net financial assets 1,828,096 1,989,733 (161,637)
Departmental net debt 1,419,356 1,646,139 (226,783)
Total non-financial assets 2,282,027 2,531,838 (249,811)
Departmental net financial position 862,671 885,699 (23,028)

OCOL’s net position in 2015-16 has not changed significantly compared to 2014-15. Net liabilities and assets have decreased, which is in line with the decrease in expenses.

Liabilities at March 31, 2016 by Type (total: $3.2 Million)
Accounts payable: $0.6 Million Accrued liabilities: $1.2 Million Vacation pay and compensatory leave: $0.8 Million Employee future benefits: $0.6 Million
Percentages 20% 36% 26% 18%
Assets at March 31, 2016 by Type (total: $4.1 Million)
Financial asset
Due from Consolidated Revenue Funds: $1.2 Million
Financial asset
Accounts receivable and advances: $0.6Million
Non-financial asset
Tangible capital assets: $2.2 Million
Non-financial asset
Prepaid expenses: $0.1 Million
Percentages 30% 14% 53% 3%

Section III: Analysis of Program(s) and Internal Services

Programs

Program 1.1: Protection of Language Rights

Description

Through this program, OCOL investigates complaints filed by citizens who believe their language rights have not been respected, evaluates compliance with the Official Languages Act by federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Act through performance measurements and audits, and intervenes proactively to prevent non-compliance with the Act. As well, the Commissioner may intervene before the courts in cases that deal with non-compliance with the Official Languages Act.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

It is important to note that OCOL received 32% more complaints in 2015–16 than in 2014–15. Certain steps in the complaint process require immediate action. Existing resources in the Compliance Assurance Branch are not sufficient to manage this volume of complaints. It is therefore difficult to complete investigations within the expected time frame.

In addition to the achievements set out in the table of priorities in Section I, OCOL:

  • put in place a quality assurance program for investigations in the Compliance Assurance Branch and demonstrated leadership by presenting this program to the investigation teams of other agents of Parliament. This program is designed to identify possible shortcomings so that processes can be improved, which in turn enables better services to be provided to citizens and service standards to be better achieved;
  • put in place mechanisms inspired by lean management concepts to continuously improve and optimize processes in order to provide better service to Canadians.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending
(authorities used)
2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
6,959,977 6,959,977 6,931,248 6,673,506 (286,471)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference
(actual minus planned)
61 64 3

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The Canadian population receives responses to its complaints and inquiries according to established service standards.

Percentage of responses provided within established service standards:

70%

45%

239 out of 526 files, in all categories combined, were processed in accordance with service standards.

  • inquiries within 30 working days;
90% — 65 out of 72
  • formal investigations within 175 working days;
15% — 40 out of 259
  • facilitated resolution within 90 days.
69% — 134 out of 195
Federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Official Languages Act improve their capacity to meet the requirements of the Act. Percentage of the Commissioner’s recommendations (made through audits and investigations) that have been implemented within specified timelines. 60%

100%

All 29 investigation report recommendations verified during 2015-16 were found to have been fully implemented.

Owing to the number of follow-ups to be done and the delays in processing them, OCOL did not verify whether the recommendations were implemented within the expected time frame.

The Canadian population benefits from the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts.

Percentage of legal proceedings involving the Commissioner that had a positive impact on the interpretation or application of the Act or the Charter.

65%

57.5%

Of the 10 court decisions rendered in cases involving the Commissioner in the past three years, five had a positive impact on the interpretation or application of the Act or the Charter, while two had a mitigated impact and positive results for certain issues.

Program 1.2: Promotion of Linguistic Duality

Description

Through this program, OCOL works with parliamentarians, federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Official Languages Act, official language communities and the Canadian public in promoting linguistic duality. OCOL builds links between federal institutions, official language communities and the different levels of government to help them better understand the needs of official language communities, the importance of bilingualism and the value of respecting Canada’s linguistic duality. To fulfill its role in that promotion, OCOL conducts research, studies and public awareness activities and intervenes with senior federal officials so that they instill a change in culture to fully integrate linguistic duality in their organizations.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In addition to the achievements set out in the table of priorities in Section I and in the table above, OCOL:

  • continued making presentations in schools: 60 presentations were made in French-language and immersion schools across the country (42 in the Atlantic Region, 11 in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, 6 in Quebec and 1 in Ontario);
  • sent letters to 90 individuals and institutions as part of the follow-up to the recommendations in the studies Beyond Bilingual Meetings: Leadership Behaviours for Managers (March 2011) and Challenges: The New Environment for Language Training in the Federal Public Service (September 2013); and
  • pursued a number of efforts to follow up on recommendations made in the 2013 study Access to Justice in Both Official Languages: Improving the Bilingual Capacity of the Superior Court Judiciary.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
6,902,349 6,902,349 6,811,745 6,059,233 (843,116)
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
53 53 0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Parliament receives advice and information about the official languages implications of evolving legislation, regulations and policies. Number of appearances before parliamentary committees and interactions with parliamentarians. 28Footnote 2

15 

Two appearances before the Senate and one appearance before the House of Commons, specifically for the 2014-15 annual report and OCOL’s Main Estimates, as well as 12 interactions with parliamentarians.

In addition, following the election of the new Liberal government, the Commissioner sent 360 letters to parliamentarians, including ministers.

Canadian society is informed of official languages rights and obligations, and of the fundamental value of linguistic duality in Canada. Number of promotional activities.Footnote 3 1 000 OCOL conducted 884 promotional activities: 20 speeches, 23 interviews, 1 press conference, 7 news releases, 2 opinion pieces, 789 meetings, 22 kiosks, 4 publications and 16 promotional articles. OCOL also responded to 555 enquiries.

Percentage of the Commissioner’s recommendations (made through annual reports, studies and other documents) that were implemented in whole or in part, or were otherwise addressed within reasonable timelines.

60

33% of the recommendations in the 2013-14 annual report have been implemented.

The analysis for the language training and language-of-work studies has not yet been completed. The results will be included in the next departmental performance report.

Internal Services

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Since legal remedies are set out in the Act, OCOL’s Legal Services are excluded from its Internal Services and are an integral part of Program 1.1 – Protection of Language Rights. As well, given their specific mandate, OCOL’s Communications Services are not included in Internal Services, but rather form part of Program 1.2 – Promotion of Linguistic Duality.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The table of priorities in Section I of this report sets out the key achievements in support of the fourth organizational priority: manage change while enabling a productive workforce and fostering a healthy work environment. In addition to these accomplishments, OCOL:

  • continued the modernization of its information management system and made significant progress in establishing a new information technology solution. Following the internal project management audit completed in July 2015, management put in place the necessary elements to optimize management of this project, which is of considerable scope for the organization. As of the end of the fiscal year, two technology solutions were in place, and two operational processes had been updated. The organization now uses these solutions for report cards for institutions and for legal opinions. Work is ongoing to implement technological solutions for investigations and follow-ups. The investigation solution is expected to be delivered at the beginning of 2016–17.
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16 Total Authorities Available for Use 2015–16 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
6,971,199 6,971,199 7,275,416 7,497,292 526,093
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
46 44 (2)

Actual spending for Internal Services for 2015-16 was $0.5 million more than planned. This is mostly due to the shared case management solution and other technology tools for the organization ($0.7 million).

Section IV: Supplementary Information

Supplementary Information Tables

The following supplementary information tables:

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16 Planned 2015–16 Actual 2015–16 Difference (actual minus planned)
46 44 (2)
Internal Audits and Evaluations

[A.] Internal Audits Completed in 2015–16

Title of internal audit Internal audit type Completion date
Audit of the IM/IT Renewal Project IT Audit January 13, 2016

[B.] Evaluations in Progress or Completed in 2015–16

Title of evaluation Status Deputy head approval date Link to the organization’s program(s)
None
User Fees, Regulatory Charges and External Fees

General and Financial Information by Fee

General Information
Fee name Fees for processing requests filed under the Access to Information Act
Fee type Regulatory fees
Fee-setting authority Access to Information Act
Section 11.(1) paragraphs a, b and c
Year introduced 1985
Year last amended 1992
Performance standard The office of the Access to Information must contact the applicant and provide the documents within 30 days of receipt of the request.
Performance results The applicants received a communication in the format of their choice in 100% of cases.
Other information No additional information to provide.
Financial Information 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
70 55 70,500
Financial Information, 2016–17, 2017–18 and 2018–19 (dollars)
Planning Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
2016–17 70 70,500
2017–18 70 73,000
2018–19 70 74,500

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Report of Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

For further information, contact one of the following offices:

Head Office

30 Victoria Street, 6th Floor
Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0T8

Telephone: 819-420-4877
Toll-free: 1-877-996-6368
TTY: 1-800-880-1990
Fax: 819-420-4873
E-mail: information@clo-ocol.gc.ca
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Regional Offices

Atlantic Region
Moncton

Telephone: 506-851-7047
Toll-free: 1-800-561-7109
Fax: 506-851-7046

Quebec Region
Montréal

Telephone: 514-283-4996
Toll-free: 1-800-363-0628
Fax: 514-283-6677

Ontario Region
Toronto

Telephone: 416-973-1903
Toll-free: 1-800-387-0635
Fax: 416-973-1906

Sudbury

Telephone: 705-671-4101
Toll-free: 1-888-272-3704
Fax: 705-671-4100

Manitoba and Saskatchewan Region
Winnipeg

Telephone: 204-983-2111
Toll-free: 1-800-665-8731
Fax: 204-983-7801

Regina

Telephone: 306-780-7866
Toll-free: 1-800-665-8731
Fax: 306-780-7896

Alberta, British Columbia, Northwest Territories,
Yukon and Nunavut Region
Edmonton

Telephone: 780-495-3111
Toll-free: 1-800-661-3642
Fax: 780-495-4094

Vancouver

Toll-free: 1-800-661-3642

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit):
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires):
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement):
Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein):
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada):
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats):
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires):
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement):
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement):
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement):
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues):
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.
plans (plan):
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities (priorités):
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program (programme):
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes):
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités):
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three‑year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
results (résultat):
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives):
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique):
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé):
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible):
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
whole-of-government framework (cadre pangouvernemental):
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government‑wide, high‑level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

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Footnote 2

This indicator includes 3 appearances before parliamentary committees and 25 exchanges with parliamentarians.

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Footnote 3

(e.g. general inquiries, speeches, media interviews, promotional tools, kiosks, news releases, regional liaison with official language communities and federal institutions).

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