Archived - Report Cards 2009-2010

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The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages issues report cards to a number of federal institutions. The report cards evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of federal institutions in terms of their various obligations under the Official Languages Act.

 
Rating Guide 2009-2010

Rating Guide 2009-2010

1) Official Languages Program Management (10%)

  1. The institution has an updated action plan that includes targeted and appropriate measures to address the shortcomings identified in investigations, previous report cards or audits by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. The targeted measures to correct these shortcomings are being implemented. Senior management is monitoring the situation to ensure progress is being made. (4%)

  2. The institution always provides the documentation required to process complaints without delay. The institution fully cooperates with the Office of the Commissioner during investigations. (2%)

  3. The institution has developed tools or procedures to take into account the impact of its major decisions, such as the addition, abolishment or modification of policies or programs (permanent mechanism, Part VII reflex) for official language minority communities and for the promotion of linguistic duality. (4%)

2) Service to the Public – Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

  1. The results of the observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner confirm the presence of an active visual offer and an active offer by staff in both official languages and the availability of service in the language of the linguistic minority. (10%)
  2. The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service on the telephone confirm the presence of an active offer in both official languages by staff or by an automated telephone system and the availability of such service in the language of the linguistic minority. (5%)
  3. The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail confirm that the response rate is proportional in both official languages, and is provided within comparable timeframes for both linguistic groups. (5%)
  4. The institution makes services of equal quality available to the public in both official languages. Bearing in mind the nature of the service and its purpose, the institution considers the particular needs of official language communities in delivering its services. (5%)

Note - Services of equal quality are not necessarily identical services but services that are tailored to the needs of official language communities, as applicable.

3) Language of Work – Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

  1. The results of the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey confirm the satisfaction of employees in a linguistic minority situation who are working in designated bilingual regions for language of work purposes with regards to the language of work regime within their institution. (20%)
  2. The measures taken in response to the survey results meet the challenges identified by the survey. Tangible results support these measures. (10%) 

4) Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians – Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The institution demonstrates that Anglophones and Francophones are represented equitably, taking into account its mandate, the public it serves and the location of its offices.

The results of the 2006 census were used as a reference for evaluating the institution against the criteria of this part.

  1. Percentage of Francophone participation outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (2.5%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region represents 4.2% of the total population. The participation of Francophones in the institution tends to reflect the presence of the Francophone community in this part of Canada.

  1. Percentage of Anglophone participation in Quebec (5%)

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

The participation of Anglophones in the institution tends to reflect the presence of the Anglophone community in this part of Canada.     

  1. Percentage of Francophone participation in the National Capital Region (2.5%)

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population

The participation of Francophones in the institution tends to reflect the presence of the Francophone community in this part of Canada.

5) Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality – Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

  1. The institution has:
  • Identified the official language communities
  • Consulted with these communities
  • Identified the needs of these communities (5%)
  1. The institution’s programs integrate the development of official language communities and the promotion of both official languages. (7.5%)

  2. The institution has taken positive measures to foster the development of official language communities and promote the equal status and use of both English and French in Canadian society. (12.5%)

The following scale was used to assign a rating to each institution regarding each qualitative criterion:

5:         All the expected elements are present 

4:         Almost all the expected elements are present

3:         Some expected elements are present

2:         Most of the expected elements are missing

1:         No expected elements are present

 

Rating scale used for the five sections of the report card and the overall rating:

Exemplary      A          90% – 100% 

Good              B          80% – 89%

Fair                C          70% – 79%

Poor               D          60% – 69%

Very Poor       E         59% and under

 
The results of the 2009-2010 report card

Report cards for 16 federal institutions

Evaluation process

Report cards were issued for 16 federal institutions. In 2009–2010, six institutions that had never received report cards were added to ensure that a variety of institutions are evaluated every year. Some 200 institutions are subject to the Official Languages Act.

The institutions were chosen on the basis of their mandate, their size and the number of admissible complaints, particularly those concerning language of work. The selection also took into account previous report card results and the need to achieve a balance among different types of institutions.

Some new criteria were introduced this year for evaluating institutional performance:

  • Federal institutions’ obligation, following the ruling in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry), to take the needs of official language communitiesFootnote 1 into consideration when delivering their services;
  • Action taken with regard to language of work since the most recent Public Service Employee Survey was conducted in 2008.

As it was last year, performance evaluation is based on quantitative results. This year, the report cards reflect the annual report’s main theme—language of work—and so more weight has been given to the language-of-work data than in the past.

A qualitative assessment was also conducted of the implementation of the institutions’ official languages programs and of Part VII of the Act concerning the vitality of official language communities and the advancement of English and French.

Full report cards for the 16 institutions that were evaluated are posted on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages Web site.

Ratings* table
  Program management Service to the public Language of work Equitable participation Advancement and support Overall rating
Canada Border Services Agency
E
C
E
B
E
E
Canada School of Public Service
C
E
C
A
C
C
Canadian International Development Agency
D
C
C
D
E
D
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
C
D
D
A
A
C
Correctional Service Canada
B
D
D
D
E
D
Fisheries Oceans Canada
A
C
C
D
A
B
Foreign Affairs International Trade Canada
D
C
E
A
E
E
Health Canada
A
B
D
E
A
C
Industry Canada
B
D
D
D
B
C
Library and Archives Canada
D
C
B
E
E
D
Natural Resources Canada
E
C
E
D
E
E
Passport Canada
E
B
B
A
E
C
Public Safety Canada
C
D
C
A
E
C
Public Service Commission of Canada
C
C
C
A
D
C
Public Works and Government Services Canada
A
B
B
D
A
B
Transport Canada
A
B
B
C
D
C

* The institutions’ results are given as letters that correspond to the following scale:
A = Exemplary, B = Good, C = Fair, D = Poor, E = Very poor.
For more information on how institutions were evaluated, please see the rating guide on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages Web site.

Results of observations

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages made observations in person, by telephone and by e-mail of the institutions that were evaluated.

Most of the observations were made between January and March 2010. Each institution provided a list of its bilingual offices from which a sample was chosen by Statistics Canada for observation.

The observations in person assessed the availability of bilingual visual active offer (posters, pictograms, publications), active offer in person (bilingual greeting such as “Hello, bonjour”) and the availability of service in the language of members of the official language community.

The observations by telephone assessed the availability of bilingual active offer by an automated system or an employee (“Hello, bonjour”), and the availability of service in the language of members of the official language community.

The observations by e-mail assessed the availability of service in both official languages, based on the number of e-mails sent. The number of replies in one language was compared with the number of replies in the other language, for the same number of requests. Also observed was the average time taken to reply in one language as compared to the other, in order to determine whether the response time was similar.

Results of observation on service 2009-2010
  In Person By Telephone By E-mail  
  Active visual offer (%) Active offer (%) Availability of service (%) Active offer (%) Availability of service (%) Availability of service (%) Appropriate response time (%) Rating
Canada Border Services Agency
98
46
89
80
81
75
53
C
Canada School of Public Service
91
40
70
57
54
***
***
E
Canadian International Development Agency
95
62
90
81
100
100
41
C
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
100
56
86
100
29
91
63
D
Correctional Service Canada
86
32
72
70
53
**
**
D
Fisheries Oceans Canada
96
61
86
88
78
75
38
C
Foreign Affairs International Trade Canada
97
56
92
69
80
100
94
C
Health Canada
86
30
74
89
91
89
95
B
Industry Canada
87
40
73
81
74
80
20
D
Library and Archives Canada
100
56
100
100
100
88
30
C
Natural Resources Canada
79
35
76
71
82
100
88
C
Passport Canada
98
48
96
100
100
*
*
B
Public Safety Canada
84
48
75
74
84
78
37
D
Public Service Commission of Canada
98
52
97
86
82
75
41
C
Public Works and Government Services Canada
96
50
80
71
100
***
***
B
Transport Canada
98
47
88
68
77
***
***
B

* The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages was not able to make anonymous e-mail observations for this institution.
** The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages was not able to make e-mail observations for this institution, because it does not communicate with the public by e-mail.
*** Given the low number of responses obtained during the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ e-mail observations, the results of these observations are not available.
N.B.: For more information on how institutions were evaluated, please see the rating guide on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages Web site.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

The term “official language communities” is used to designate official language minority communities.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Institutions

Canada Border Services Agency
2009-2010 Report Card
Canada Border Services Agency

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

According to the Canada Border Services Agency’ business goals and HR priorities laid out in the 2009-2012 Human Resources Management Plan (HRMP), the Agency must ensure effective and efficient border services.

The plan devotes two paragraphs to official languages matters under the heading of “Official Languages Considerations.” The final paragraph underscores the need to develop and integrate official languages tools, policies and directives to support the effective management of official languages practices in the Agency. 

However, it offers no details on any plans relating to this need or the aforementioned goal of effective and efficient border services.

The Agency has three other plans concerning official languages matters. These regional plans are not linked with the HRMP’s aforementioned goal, and do not figure in the plan’s reference to tools, policies and directives. They are also unrelated to one another.

Two of these plans are actions plans. One concerns the Northern Ontario region that includes the point of entry to Canada at the Macdonald-Cartier International Airport; the other, the Atlantic region. Both fail to set out targets or quantifiable results. The third plan is ascribed to the Official Languages Program (OLP) in national headquarters. As more of a work tool for use strictly by OLP staff than an action plan, it describes ongoing or new activities and projects and is revised monthly.

As for tools, pocket and mouse-pad translators were provided across Canada to border services officers for the 2010 Olympic Winter Games. Officers at Macdonald-Cartier Airport—a point of entry to the nation’s capital that received three complaints regarding service to the public this year—were slated to receive these tools toward the end of 2009–2010. 

In the past, the institution has had difficulty providing pertinent information for use in complaint resolution. This year, to address this concern, we established a working relationship with the Agency to bring about lasting results in systemic issues. Thus far, complaints investigation data have been largely provided by OLP staff, and excludes our direct access to managers. In the coming year, working in tandem with the Agency, we will emphasize our duty of impartiality and independence in investigations.

E

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 98% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 46% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 89% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 80% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 81% of cases.

The results of the observations regarding service by e-mail made by the Office of the Commissioner confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 75% of the time, and within comparable time periods 53% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

We have noted that the Agency did not foresee measures to take into consideration the needs of official language communities in delivering its service programs to the public.

As the Agency is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures permitting it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. The Agency would benefit from using Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid developed to assist institutions in reviewing their services and programs.

C

Language of Work – Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions from the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 65% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 67% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfactions rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

71%

76%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

59%

56%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

65%

52%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

76%

69%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

64%

71%

Related information on language of work

The Agency offers on-demand information sessions to senior managers regarding language of work.

The offer is not made to lower-level employees who may receive or consult information electronically on this part of the Official Languages Act. Only in the event of complaints resolution concerning their immediate work environment will lower-level employees be invited to a language-of-work information session.

E

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 3.3% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 28.2% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 16.6% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System, March 2010)

B

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality - Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The Agency has not identified the needs of the official language minority communities.

Its communication with them targets the recruitment of bilingual border services officers.

The Agency has not integrated the development of official language communities or the promotion of both official languages into its programs.

Furthermore, it has no development strategy with regard to official language communities. Measures taken to meet its obligations under Part IV may have only an indirect positive impact on official language communities. For instance, a pamphlet entitled Vivez les Jeux en français, produced in partnership with the Economic Development Corporation of British Columbia and the Western Economic Development Corporation, was given to Francophone visitors who stopped by the Olympic booth at the Vancouver airport during the Games.

E

Overall Rating

E

 
Canada School of Public Service
2009-2010 Report Card
Canada School of Public Service

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

As part of its mandate, the Canada School of Public Service (the School) offers learning opportunities for public servants across Canada. As a provider of learning services and tools for the Government of Canada, part of the School’s mandate is to make federal public servants aware of their obligations regarding official language minority communities. It also promotes the development of official language communities and the idea of linguistic duality through the learning products it offers.

The School has an action plan for 2009–2010 regarding parts IV, V and VI of the Official Languages Act (the Act); this plan includes target dates and indicates the groups or persons responsible for the action items. It also has a second action plan for 2009–2010 specific to Part VII. Unlike the first, this second plan does not provide target dates. Activities in both plans primarily involve knowledge transfer and the general promotion of official languages, but do not list targeted measures to address deficiencies. The School is being evaluated for the first time as part of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ report card exercise.

The School has an Official Languages Working Group that supports and promotes its official language activities. This group, which meets regularly on a quarterly basis, has met six times since July 2008. The School is currently reviewing and clarifying the group’s governance structure and organization. Its Official Languages Champion reports to senior management about the group’s activities so that senior management can ensure progress is being made. The Champion is also a member of the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions and of the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages.

The School provides complaints investigation documentation promptly. The Office of the Commissioner appreciates the School’s cooperation during investigations and, when required, has had direct access to managers and employees to effectively address complaints.

The School, as a provider of learning services and tools for the entire federal public service, contributes indirectly to the development of official language minority communities. Initiatives like the School’s Direxion program demonstrate its attention to Part VII, but it is unclear as to what extent.  

In its 2009–2011 Action Plan for the Implementation of section 41 of the Act, the School acknowledges the importance of forging lasting relationships with official language minority communities, with whom its regional offices work on a regular basis. For example, the School collaborated with the Fédération franco-ténoise, Aurora College (Yellowknife) and Nunavut Arctic College (Inuvik) to provide second-language learning opportunities for Francophones in the North.

The School has provided tools and learning opportunities that promote linguistic duality. However, more work could be done to show that policies and programs developed are useful to official language minority communities.

C

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 91% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 40% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 70% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 57% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 54% of cases.

Given the low response rate during the Office of the Commissioner’s observation regarding service by e-mail, results are not available.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that the consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

As the School is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures that allow it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. The School would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid, developed to help institutions review their services and programs.

E

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey regarding bilingual regions showed that 87% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. Given the limited number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Quebec, the results have been omitted.

The satisfaction rates per question are presented below.

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

88%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

73%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

89%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

93%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

N/A

90%

Discussions with School representatives indicate that management is comfortable with the satisfaction rates. Actions are needed to address the question on how employees felt regarding being able to prepare written materials (including e-mail) in the official language of their choice.

Regular communications to the public highlighting the importance of all parts of the Official Languages Act and underscoring employee rights regarding language of work are available on the School’s intranet site and via e-mail. The intranet site also features an official languages section that offers an array of information and tools.

C

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, the workforce is 48.9% Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 68.8% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 40.9% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The School, as a provider of learning services and tools for the entire federal public service, contributes indirectly to the development of official language communities through the training it offers public servants. The documentation makes no reference to the creation of an official language communities list. As indicated below, the School has initiated programs that promote official language communities; however, it is unclear as to how these programs meet their needs, given that the School does not currently have such a list.

In partnership with Canadian Heritage, the School has begun exploring ways to provide language-retention practicums in official language communities.

The School is a member of the three-party sub-committee of the Federal Council of Saskatchewan and the Official Languages Leaders sub-committee. The sub-committee discusses ways to improve official language services to the public and looks to create initiatives whereby governments can more effectively address responsibilities under Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

As previously mentioned, the School’s Direxion program familiarizes future leaders in the public service with the notions of linguistic duality and official language communities as well as with Part VII of the Act. Last year, 48 program participants visited Francophone communities in Saskatchewan and New Brunswick to discuss the realities of being a linguistic minority. The program highlighted the diversity of official language communities, along with their realities and their needs in different areas. The Direxion program is an indirect way for the School to foster the development of official language communities and promote the use of both English and French in Canada by fostering a greater understanding among federal public servants of the complexities and realities of official language communities.

As part of the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013, the School has also undertaken a pilot project to provide access to official languages training products to 10 Canadian universities, thereby providing opportunities for second-language development and maintenance among future public servants. This project gives them access to award-winning online language training tools and products, including leading-edge technologies, language evaluation simulations and assessments, and interactive tools designed to improve comprehension, pronunciation, grammar and writing skills. A total of 193 students are currently taking part in the initiative.

While consultation with official language communities is evident, it is unclear how the School tries to meet their needs. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages encourages the School to look for opportunities for identifying the needs of official language communities and to take action accordingly.

C

Overall Rating

C

 
Canadian International Development Agency
2009-2010 Report Card
Canadian International Development Agency

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

The Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) has two separate official languages action plans, the first pertaining to parts IV, V and VI, and the second pertaining to Part VII of the Official Languages Act (the Act).

The main areas of action identified in the plan for parts IV, V and VI are as follows: language of work, service to clients, governance, training, tools, communication, and awareness and monitoring.

The second plan is a results-based three-year action plan for the implementation of section 41 of the Act. It is divided into six main areas of action: awareness, consultation, communication, coordination and liaison, program funding and delivery and accountability.

Certain measures included in the action plans address shortcomings that had come to our attention in the form of complaints in recent years, notably with regard to language of work. These include messages to senior management and staff regarding linguistic rights and obligations.

In the action plan on parts IV, V and VI of the Act, there is little information concerning the implementation status of each measure, aside from a footnote indicating that they are in the process of being implemented. The plan should be revised to more clearly report on the implementation status of each measure.

CIDA has been working on developing a new Official Languages Action Plan that integrates all parts of the Act. On March 31, 2010, the plan was still in draft form, pending approval from CIDA’s Management Board. The new plan will cover a two-year period (2010–2012). The main areas of action that have been identified are as follows: language of work, champion’s leadership, service to clients, governance, consultations and coordination and liaison, training, tools, communication and awareness, monitoring and positive measures.

In 2009, the Official Languages Advisory Committee was revamped and a new champion named. The Committee’s mandate is to provide advice and suggestions to the President and Management Board. However, its mandate fails to mention the Agency's Part VII obligations, even though CIDA’s National Coordinator on the implementation of section 41 is a member of the committee. CIDA should ensure that the committee’s mandate includes Part VII obligations, as the Agency is looking to develop an integrated Official Languages Action Plan.

In general, CIDA officials have been cooperative in providing information for the resolution of complaints and also throughout this exercise.

CIDA has not produced any tools or implemented any procedures to take into account the impact of its major decisions, such as the addition, elimination or modification of official language minority community policies or programs. However, CIDA continues to successfully promote Canada’s linguistic duality in its missions and projects abroad. For example, it continues to support the Francophonie through initiatives like the Canadian Francophonie Scholarship Program, which enables students from 37 Francophonie countries to pursue post-secondary education in Canada. One quarter of the program’s budget (25%) is awarded to students who attend a Francophone university outside of Quebec. CIDA would benefit from consulting official language communities to determine whether this ratio allows it to meet its linguistic obligations.

D

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 95% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 62% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 90% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 81% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 100% of cases.

The results of the observations regarding service by e-mail made by the Office of the Commissioner confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 100% of the time, and within comparable time periods 41% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that the consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

As CIDA is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures that allow it to achieve substantive equality. The Agency would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid, developed to help institutions review their services and programs.

C

Language of Work  Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 83% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime.

Due to the small number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Quebec, the survey results in this regard have been omitted. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

87%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

66%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

84%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

90%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

N/A

88%

Overall, CIDA’s results demonstrate that Francophone employees in regions designated as bilingual for language-of-work purposes are content. It should be noted, however, that only 66% of these employees feel that they can use their official language of choice when using e-mail or preparing written material. CIDA will address this issue in the new integrated action plan that is still in draft form and awaiting approval from the Management Board.

C

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians  Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, the workforce is 0% Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 53.6% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

CIDA does not have any offices in Quebec that could show Anglophone workforce participation.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

D

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality  Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

CIDA’s Results-based Three-year Action Plan for the Implementation of section 41 of the Act is divided into six main areas of action: awareness, consultation, communication, coordination and liaison, program funding and delivery and accountability.

CIDA has a draft action plan awaiting Management Board approval that integrates all parts of the Act.

CIDA has taken steps to consult and involve official language communities in the achievement of its mandate objectives of reducing poverty and contributing to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world. Its partners include multilateral and international organizations, but CIDA has also developed many partnerships with Canadian organizations, including universities and colleges, labour unions, youth groups and churches.

In 2009–2010, CIDA tripled the number of official language communities consulted through a letter campaign. Twelve national organisations were given the opportunity to comment and provide feedback on CIDA’s programming and services. The results of this campaign will be included in the integrated action plan, which—as mentioned previously—is currently awaiting approval.

CIDA’s Canadian Francophonie Scholarship Program enables students from 37 Francophonie countries to pursue post-secondary education in Canada. Twenty-five percent (25%) of the program’s budget is awarded to students who attend a Francophone university outside of Quebec.

Through CIDA’s Global Classroom Initiative, the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Education has developed and delivered a series of workshops and institutes, specialized courses on ways to teach international development issues in classrooms, and lesson plans and curriculum aids, in both English and French.

CIDA also funded a Université de Moncton project that allowed New Brunswick Francophones to share their international development experiences through round tables, conferences and school presentations.

While CIDA has identified official language communities, it has consulted national organizations and will include their feedback in the draft integrated action plan. Official language community needs have not been identified; as a result, CIDA is not in a position to integrate these needs into its programs and services. CIDA would benefit from consulting community organizations in minority communities across Canada to identify their needs and include these in the draft integrated action plan. The Agency needs to identify potentially positive measures for promoting the development of official language communities and the equality of status and use of both official languages if it is to fully respect its obligations under the Official Languages Act.

E

Overall Rating

D

 
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) has an official languages action plan that comprises objectives and planned activities to improve compliance with the Official Languages Act (the Act), together with associated schedules and follow-up procedures. The 2007–2010 action plan for the implementation of parts IV, V and VI of the Act expired on March 31, 2010, and a new three-year plan has been readied for approval by senior management. Articulated around the 2007–2010 action plan, the priorities related to the allocation of resources and the official languages strategy and communication activities provide insight into how the activities in the action plan will be carried out. However, this plan contains only a few targeted measures that specifically address the concerns and recommendations of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. In addition, the fact that some measures will be carried over to the new action plan indicates that there have been some implementation delays.

During the performance interview with representatives of this institution, we learned that the monitoring of implementation and communication of the results achieved through the plan has not come up for formal discussion by the senior management committee since its adoption in 2007. However, a dashboard used by the Human Resources Branch includes official languages indicators, providing a separate portrait of each branch. In January 2010, official languages objectives were incorporated into CIC’s Integrated Corporate Plan. This will help to give greater visibility and ensure follow-up by senior management, while promoting the inclusion of official languages objectives in all departmental activities.

CIC renewed its action plan for the implementation of Section 41 of the Act in summer 2009. The new plan spanning four years adheres to the timetable for the Government of Canada’s Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013. Every year, the institution has submitted its annual report on the implementation of Section 41, enabling senior management to apprise itself of the measures taken in the preceding fiscal year and the activities planned for the coming year.

CIC’s National Official Languages Advisor provides the Office of the Commissioner with information related to the handling of complaints. Information concerning complaints is generally provided to the Office of the Commissioner in a timely manner.

The Francophone Minority Communities Steering Committee is CIC’s permanent mechanism for ensuring that the needs of official language communities are recognized and integrated into departmental activities. In 2009–2010, the implementation committee, which reports to the steering committee, was established and concrete implementation activities are already being carried out in support of Francophone minority communities. With regard to the specific needs of the English-speaking minority community in Quebec, CIC is working directly with the Quebec Community Groups Network and the Community Table.

C

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 100% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 56% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 86% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 100% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 29% of cases.

The results of the observations regarding service by e-mail made by the Office of the Commissioner confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 91% of the time, and within comparable time periods 63% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

The institution plans interesting measures as part of the activities resulting from its obligation to foster the development and the enhancement of official language communities, activities which must have some effect on the quality of service delivery and communications with the public. It would be interesting to find out if the measures provided for in Part VII of the Act are as carefully planned as would be expected.

As CIC is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures permitting it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. CIC would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid developed to assist institutions in reviewing their services and programs.

D

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 74% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 86% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

91%

82%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

85%

58%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

90%

65%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

92%

81%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

73%

81%

In spite of the weak results, the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey reveals an improvement in the level of satisfaction of Anglophone employees in Quebec with regard to language of work provisions. A number of measures were implemented to promote the use of English in the workplace and better integrate Anglophones in working environments where French is the main language spoken. For example, the institution has appointed an official languages champion for the Quebec Region who has supported the establishment of a twinning system to promote communication in English among employees and facilitate the retention of skills. In addition, the official languages team carried out a campaign to highlight linguistic rights and obligations in regions designated bilingual for language‑of‑work purposes.

In terms of satisfaction of Francophone employees working in bilingual regions outside Quebec, targeted measures should be implemented to increase the rate of employee satisfaction.

D

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 7.1% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 38.9% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 21.0% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality - Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The CIC Francophone Minority Communities Steering Committee has identified official language communities that use its services and has established a mechanism for identifying individuals belonging to these communities. The Steering Committee, as well as regional steering committees hold regular meetings with stakeholders who work with official language communities and discussions are geared to identifying the needs of the communities and the challenges they face. In addition, in 2009, CIC commissioned Statistics Canada to conduct a special study entitled Statistical Portrait of the French-Speaking Immigrant Population Outside Quebec (1991 to 2006), so that it could analyze the needs of immigrants from official language communities.

CIC largely integrates the development of official language communities into its four main programs, namely immigration, integration, citizenship and multiculturalism. Furthermore, foreign recruitment has been expanded to include more French-speaking countries in order to attract more Francophones to Canada who will then integrate into various communities, whether they are official language minority or majority communities. Also, a new Web site for French-speaking immigrants was launched in March, 2010. The site gives French‑speaking newcomers information on their reception and orientation, integration assistance, language training and preparing for the job market.

Numerous initiatives pertaining to economic integration have been undertaken. For example, CIC has created a pilot project with the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité in order to study companies’ capacity and needs for employing Francophone immigrants and to build a database of potential candidates in collaboration with Pôle Emploi international.

CIC, in collaboration with the Quebec Metropolis Centre and the Quebec Community Groups Network, is looking at opportunities for research on regional immigration, policies and programs tailored to the specific needs of small English-speaking communities and their potential contribution. The Metropolis project organized the fourth edition of a pre-conference session on Francophone immigration to Canada. More than 200 participants attended the event, which took place in Montréal on March 18, 2010.

In consultation with interested parties, CIC has implemented four research projects aiming to support the Anglophone communities in Quebec. Moreover, in 2009, CIC commissioned a special study from Statistics Canada. The Statistical Portrait of the French-Speaking Immigrant Population Outside Quebec (1991 to 2006) outlines the demographic, linguistic, social and economic characteristics of Francophone immigrants in minority situations, as well as the challenges they face with regard to their integration and contribution to the vitality of Francophone minority communities. Finally, during the Metropolis national conference in March 2010, the Metropolis Project launched the Best Practices Manual on Francophone Immigration in Canada and the Current Research Compendium on Francophone Immigration in Canada, dealing with recruitment, integration and retention of Francophone immigrant minorities.

For several years now, the Office of the Commissioner has noted certain shortfalls with respect to promoting the equal status and use of French and English in the citizenship ceremonies organized by CIC. Although citizenship judges are not selected by CIC, the ceremony coordination team could do a better job of incorporating French into such events when new Francophone immigrants are taking the oath of citizenship. To improve the compliance of its citizenship ceremonies, CIC prepares modules on speeches in English and French for the citizenship judges. The speeches must mention Canada’s linguistic duality. The Citizenship Commission offers French training and various opportunities for judges to improve their French-language skills in order to effectively deliver citizenship ceremonies in both languages, thereby promoting Canada’s linguistic duality.

A

Overall Rating

C

 
Correctional Service Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Correctional Service Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

The Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) has an official languages action plan for 2008‑2011 that addresses activities for all parts of the Official Languages Act (the Act). Creating an action plan was one of the commitments made by the CSC following the 2007–2008 report card. The Official Languages Action Plan includes targeted and appropriate measures. It also lists activities for 2009–2010 and beyond aimed at helping it achieve its objectives, and identifies officers of primary interest for each activity.

The Official Languages Action Plan was developed by the Official Languages Committee that presents its financial and resource needs to the Executive Committee, which meets approximately every six months. Official languages have become a round table topic and have been integrated into employment equity discussions.

Official languages are also part of senior management performance assessments. Senior management is responsible for implementing concrete measures to enhance the use of both official languages in the workplace.

The institution does not always provide the required documentation in a timely manner to process a complaint effectively.

The CSC’s Public Notice Advertising document makes reference to its obligations under the Act and its commitment to Part VII to enhancing the vitality of official language minority communities.

The CSC also uses a database to identify and seek out community groups, organizations and other potential stakeholders and partners, including those from official language minority communities.

B

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 86% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 32% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 72% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 70% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 53% of cases. 

Given the low response rate during the Office of the Commissioner’s observation regarding service by e-mail, results are not available.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that the consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

As part of the CSC’s commitment to addressing the low active offer ratings in its previous two report cards, it undertook an active offer audit which was performed throughout the regions during summer 2009. The findings concluded that many offices and establishments fell short of full compliance with official languages policies, though manners of non-compliance varied from region to region. The CSC has decided to develop regional-level practices to target the specific areas in which each region is lacking. It has also developed communications products for its front-line employees and for those who provide services to the public. Tools consisting of statement cards with common greetings written phonetically in both official languages have been distributed. Monthly audits of the quality of the active offer of in-person service also began on May 18, 2009.

The CSC continues to face challenges in recruiting bilingual health care providers. Nonetheless, progress has been achieved since issues were raised in the Audit of the direct health care services by four federal institutions: Health Canada, Veterans Affairs Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Correctional Service Canada, published in July 2007 by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. The Quebec and Atlantic regions are actively recruiting from English and French universities to address the linguistic needs of medical personnel in CSC establishments.

As the CSC is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures that allow it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. The CSC would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid, developed to help institutions review their services and programs.

D

Language of Work  Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 74% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 58% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

73%

85%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

57%

64%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

46%

60%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

59%

80%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

55%

78%

The CSC has issued reminders and communications about language of work obligations and the linguistic rights of employees in direct response to the Language of Work Survey and previous Office of the Commissioner report cards. These measures have clearly been insufficient to correct the matter.

D

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians  Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, the workforce is 5.9% Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 45.2% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 2.1% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

D

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality - Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

In May 2009, the CSC’s Citizen Engagement Branch reached out to official language minority communities, specifically those located within the vicinity of a CSC establishment, through an information package mail-out. The package included fact sheets on the CSC’s mandate, how to get involved with the CSC, its Speaker’s Bureau and its Transformation Agenda. The packages were sent in both official languages to approximately 140 official language communities across Canada. There is no indication that the needs of these 140 communities have been identified.

The CSC also holds regular meetings between the National Executive Committee of the Citizen Advisory Committees and the Joint Committee on Community Corrections (consisting of the Federal Council of Municipalities, Correctional Service of Canada, National Parole Board and Public Safety Canada). These meetings encourage discussion between governments and Canadians.

The CSC’s outreach work to enhance understanding of its mandate among official language communities is evident. However, it is unclear what positive measures the CSC has taken to foster the development and promote the equal status of both English and French in its correctional facilities. The CSC has made efforts to engage the communities located near correctional facilities; however, it needs to identify the positive measures that have been taken internally to develop official language communities within establishments across Canada. It also needs to show how correctional facilities use official language communities to provide programming and support to offenders.

To better understand its commitments under Part VII, the CSC also continues to participate in a Canadian Heritage-led interdepartmental committee on Part VII. 

The CSC’s Official Languages Action Plan for 2008–2011 highlighted its efforts to provide a $5,000 fund for official language communities. Unfortunately, the CSC has decided to use the fund to support initiatives already included in its Official Languages Action Plan, as opposed to supporting special initiatives that target official language communities.

The Office of the Commissioner encourages the CSC to take an active approach in addressing the needs of official language communities. The CSC has taken a first step with its outreach activities. However, it must also take the necessary steps to meet the needs expressed by official language community members, as well as monitor the impact of these measures.

E

Overall Rating

D

 
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has developed an official languages action plan for 2008–2011 that features two components. The first component, People, addresses DFO’s obligations under parts IV, V and VI of the Official Languages Act (the Act). The activities in this component are organized within three strategic priorities: leadership, institutional capacity and personal capacity. The second, Citizen-Focused Service, addresses the Department’s obligations under Part VII of the Act and is divided into six main areas of action: awareness, consultation, communications, coordination and liaison, program funding and delivery, and accountability. 

The action plan was approved by DFO’s Departmental Management Committee in 2008, and includes an accountability framework that outlines the roles and responsibilities of all involved. Both documents are available to employees through the Department’s intranet site. Some action plan items are described as ongoing, while others are time-specific. Progress is monitored throughout the year during monthly meetings between national and regional official language coordinators. The action plan is also monitored during DFO’S annual Health of HR exercise to report on elements of concern from a human resources perspective. In DFO and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Deputy Minister, ADM and Director General responsible for HR and Policy are directly involved in the full implementation of the plan. Department-wide activities that require the intervention of senior management are tabled before the Departmental Management Committee for discussion.

DFO’s action plan incorporates measures to address the shortcomings identified both in the last report card from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages and in recent investigations. For example, DFO’s 2007-2008 report card indicated a need for greater efforts regarding the active offer and provision of services in both official languages. DFO has since followed up with the managers of all offices observed in the last Office of the Commissioner exercise to ensure that corrective measures have been taken. Offices listed in Burolis were reviewed to ensure the availability of service in both official languages. Internal spot-checks were conducted at various DFO offices in November and December 2009, with immediate feedback provided to individuals to enhance the impact of these spot-checks.

DFO has also developed an active offer toolkit for all employees required to provide service in both official languages. The kit includes key phrases for greeting the public in both official languages, explanatory notes on DFO’s official languages obligations, and active offer stickers.

Another area in need of attention identified by the investigation process was the appropriate designation of bilingual positions. DFO has addressed this matter by implementing a new procedure that obliges managers to use the Treasury Board’s tool to determine the linguistic profile of all new or modified bilingual positions. Managers are also required to submit their reports to the Human Resources department for review.

DFO is committed to working with the Office of the Commissioner to resolve complaints, and cooperates fully with the Office of the Commissioner’s employees in this regard.

A

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 96% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 61% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 86% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 88% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 78% of cases.

The results of the observations regarding service by e-mail made by the Office of the Commissioner confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 75% of the time, and within comparable time periods 38% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that the consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

DFO has established a mechanism to determine the impact of major decisions on services to the public that affect official language minority communities. The Department has incorporated this activity into its Official Languages Action Plan and has installed a permanent mechanism for assessing how decisions related to program changes affect official language communities. The National Official Languages Coordinator is responsible for reviewing all memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions to assess the potential impact on official language communities of any changes or additions to their programs that are pending approval. Thirteen analysis documents pertaining to section 41 were produced in the course of drafting memoranda to Cabinet.

As DFO is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures that allow it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. DFO would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid, developed to help institutions review their services and programs.

C

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that, overall, 77% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime.

Given the limited number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Quebec, the results have been omitted.

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

82%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

67%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

71%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

82%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

N/A

81%

DFO has developed an action plan in response to the Public Service Employee Survey results. An official languages clause has been added to this plan, indicating that respect for both official languages is a question of leadership and that actions regarding language of work have been addressed in DFO’s official languages action plan.

The Department’s 2008–2011 Official Languages Action Plan shows that language of work issues have been given consideration. The DFO holds its Departmental Management Committee and national-level meetings entirely in English or entirely in French on an alternate basis. Documents for all national meetings are distributed in both official languages, and employees located in bilingual regions are informed that they can participate in meetings in the language of their choice via the intranet. They are also reminded of their rights and encouraged to use their language of choice at the beginning of each meeting.

Overall, the survey results show that Francophone employees in regions designated as bilingual for language-of-work purposes are satisfied. It should be noted, however, that only 67% of those employees feel that they can use their official language of choice when using e-mail and preparing written material, while only 71% feel free to use the language of their choice with their immediate supervisor. Having a specific action plan to address the survey results would likely benefit DFO’s Francophone employees in regions designated as bilingual.

C

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, the workforce is 7% Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, the workforce is 35.9% Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, the workforce is 2.6% Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

It should be noted that the DFO’s Quebec offices are located in regions designated as unilingual for language-of-work purposes.

D

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

DFO’s accountability framework includes Part VII of the Official Languages Act and defines the ensuing roles and responsibilities. The Citizen-Focused Service component of DFO’s Official Languages Action Plan addresses Part VII of the Act and is organized under six main areas of action: awareness, consultation, communications, coordination and liaison, program funding and delivery, and accountability. The Action Plan is reviewed yearly, while an activity report detailing actions taken and progress achieved is produced every fiscal year.

DFO continues to review its memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions. In its last report card, the Department was asked to raise awareness among key personnel responsible for aligning the development, renewal or devolution of policies, programs and services with Part VII of the Act. In response, it has notably posted a guide for drafting Cabinet documents on its policies Web site. This guide includes key questions for decision-making and other pertinent fact-sheets. The national Part VII Coordinator participates in the annual training sessions for employees responsible for preparing memoranda to Cabinet, providing them with information regarding DFO’s Part VII obligations. The coordinator also participates in monthly group meetings concerning Cabinet documents under development. As a result, 46% of the memoranda to Cabinet drafted by DFO last year generated recommendations for mitigating the potential negative impacts and demonstrating the potential positive impacts on the vitality of official language minority communities and the promotion of linguistic duality.

Informal consultation mechanisms have been implemented to help identify official language community needs and mandates. With the exception of the Pacific region (unstaffed Part VII coordinator position), all DFO regions have established informal consultation mechanisms aimed at better understanding the concerns and needs of official language communities, particularly those dependant on fisheries recourse. For example, management at the Maritime regional office regularly meet with the Fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Ecosse, while the Regional Director General for the Quebec region meets with official language community representatives on an annual basis. In the Maritimes’ Sydney office, DFO met with Francophone representatives regarding the relocation of the St. Peter’s office. No concerns were raised at that meeting, but the official language community was pleased to have been consulted and to know that an office would still be maintained in a different part of the county.

In Alberta, DFO and other federal departments participated in a workshop organised by the Association canadienne-française de l’Alberta to identify areas where federal departments could assist official language community needs.

DFO has taken steps to help official language communities achieve their development objectives by participating in five round-table meetings of the National Committee for Economic Development and Employability (NCEDE) for official language communities, held by the Human Rresources Services Directorate. Similarly, it participated in the review of agreement protocols between federal institutions and NCEDE representatives from the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité and the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation (CEDEC). The Quebec region also handled transportation costs to enable fishermen’s association representatives from Anglophone minority communities to attend various fishing resources management consultation committees. Decisions taken by these committees could affect the economies of official language communities who depend on fishing resources.

DFO’s national Part VII coordinators (national and regional) continue to maintain solid working relationships with other federal Part VII coordinators to discuss issues and share information and best practices. 

DFO’s continued funding of and participation in projects demonstrates its commitment to promoting the use of English and French both internally and in Canada. In the context of the 475th anniversary of Gaspé and to honour the contribution of the region’s Anglophone minority community to the history of the Maritimes, DFO, in partnership with the Committee for Anglophone Social Action and the CEDEC, acknowledged William Wakeham as a historical figure. One of the project’s highlights was the creation of an audio guide on Mr. Wakeham and the region’s commercial fishery development.

DFO participated in the 2009 World Acadian Congress by mounting an information booth and producing a bilingual historical information document on lighthouses and docks. In the context of Quebec City’s 400th anniversary and linguistic duality, DFO developed a commemorative map on the voyages and explorations of Samuel de Champlain. A replica of the period ship Surveyor used by the British Admiralty was also docked at the Old Port of Québec during the festivities.

On January 20, 2010, DFO held its Official Languages Day in the NCR. The event gave employees a chance to discover new language tools like the Translation Bureau’s Termium program, virtual learning facilities and legislative and departmental policies, as well as chat with personnel from various federal departments. A French bistro and English tea house were set up so that employees could sit and chat in the official language of their choice. DFO continues to use its intranet site to provide official languages information to employees on a regular basis.

It is clear that DFO has taken steps to integrate official language community development and the promotion of both official languages into its action plan. DFO would benefit from assessing the impact of its actions and positive measures on official language communities.

A

Overall Rating

B

 
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

The Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) has two official languages action plans. The Official Languages Program Action Plan concerns parts IV, V and VI of the Official Languages Act (the Act), while the 2007–2010 Results-based Action Plan concerns Part VII of the Act.

The Official Languages Program Action Plan was developed in November 2009 after an internal audit. It has three objectives:

  1. Implement the Action Plan and monitor the implementation process;
  2. Implement a monitoring system so as to manage the Action Plan effectively;
  3. Review and update official languages data in the Human Resources Management System to ensure their accuracy for purposes of planning, staffing, training, testing and reporting (both to central agencies and internally).

The Results-based Action Plan (section 41 of the Act) concerns six priorities: awareness, consultation, communications, coordinating and liaising, program funding and delivery, and accountability.

These plans include targeted measures aimed at allowing the Department to meet its language obligations. DFAIT has developed three new internal official languages policies that have been sent to all staff. These policies are designed to improve the promotion of language rights and obligations and facilitate management of the Official Languages Program (language training and learning retention, language designation of positions, staffing of bilingual positions).

DFAIT has run awareness sessions for staff at all levels to make its policies better known. It has initiated one system for monitoring non-imperative appointments and another for monitoring performance in the area of official languages at missions abroad.

DFAIT should further its efforts by developing mechanisms to promote understanding of the other parts of the Act, including parts IV and VII.

Since the expiration of the Results-based Action Plan, DFAIT has not indicated that it will be updated or that a new plan will be developed. It would be beneficial for DFAIT to develop an official languages action plan with better-defined objectives to ensure respect of the language obligations pursuant to the Act.

During the period covered by this exercise, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has received satisfactory cooperation from those responsible for official languages at DFAIT regarding the resolution of identified language issues.

The Department uses the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Official Languages Checklist, a required tool when preparing Treasury Board submissions. However, DFAIT has not developed any tools or procedures for gauging the impact of its major decisions (adding, eliminating or changing policies or programs) on official language minority communities.

Nonetheless, DFAIT emphasizes the promotion of linguistic duality across the country and abroad. For example, the Department makes a financial contribution to the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie to support that organization’s four-year program, a component of which promotes the French language and linguistic and cultural diversity.

D

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of service in person made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, visual active offer was present in 97% of cases, active offer by staff was made in 56% of cases, and service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 92% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 69% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 80% of cases.

The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 100% of the time, and within comparable time periods 94% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that the consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

As DFAIT is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures that allow it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. The Department would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid, developed to help institutions review their services and programs.

C

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that 74% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime.

Due to the small number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Quebec, the survey results in this regard have been omitted. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

85%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

57%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

67%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

81%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

N/A

80%

All in all, the DFAIT results show that Francophone employees in regions designated bilingual for language-of-work purposes are satisfied. However, only 57% feel free to write in the language of their choice, while just 67% feel free to interact with their supervisors in their language of choice. It would be helpful to Francophone DFAIT employees if the Action Plan was amended to correct these weaknesses.

E

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, the workforce is 5.1% Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, the workforce is 36.1% Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, the workforce is 13% Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System, March 2010)

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The now-expired 2007–2010 Results-based Action Plan covered six priorities: awareness, consultation, communications, coordinating and liaising, program funding and delivery, and accountability. It would be useful for DFAIT to develop a multi-year action plan for the coming years. The new plan should include a section setting out deadlines and the implementation status for each initiative.

During the period covered by this report card, DFAIT developed and implemented initiatives to promote Canada’s two official languages.

Information sessions were developed and delivered to DFAIT employees to increase their knowledge of Part VII of the Official Languages Act. One goal of these sessions was to develop a Part VII reflex so that the needs of official language communities would be taken into account when planning departmental activities.

However, DFAIT did not seize the occasion to identify official language communities, consult them and identify their needs. This necessary step should be undertaken so that the needs of these communities can be included in the management of the Department’s official languages program.

DFAIT continues its efforts to promote and cooperate with the Francophonie. It celebrates the Journée internationale de la Francophonie within the Department, in Canada and abroad. For example, Francophonie celebrations are held around the world in March of each year, and the Department was an active participant in the activities presented at Expo 2010 in China (March 5–27).

The cultural sector grant program known as Promart ended on March 31, 2009 and was not replaced. The program’s elimination was investigated by the Office of the Commissioner. DFAIT did not assess the elimination’s possible impact on official language communities before proceeding. However, we learned that there is a financial assistance program (Global Opportunities for Associations) for national associations that work to develop international cultural industry markets. The Department has not demonstrated that this program has remedied the problems observed since the elimination of Promart.

E

Overall Rating

E

 
Health Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Health Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

Health Canada has an official languages action plan that comprises objectives and planned activities to improve compliance with the Official Languages Act (the Act), together with associated schedules and follow-up procedures. This action plan includes a comparative table showing the results of the report cards issued by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. It also includes a number of the measures that specifically address the concerns and recommendations of the Office of the Commissioner.

Among the measures adopted under the Official Languages Action Plan, performance indicators related to official languages have been incorporated into the Integrated Business and Human Resource Plan, which is included in the 2009–2010 Operational Plan. This measure gives visibility to the official languages performance indicators and ensures monitoring of indicator status by management and senior management.

In summer 2009, Health Canada (HC) renewed its action plan for the implementation of section 41 of the Act. The new plan, which spans four years, adheres to the timetable for Canadian Heritage’s Roadmap. As in previous years, the institution has submitted its annual report on the implementation of section 41 of the Act, enabling senior management to apprise itself of the measures taken in the preceding fiscal year and the activities planned for the coming year.

During the year, Health Canada’s official languages unit underwent major changes that help it to address complaints and solve issues that are brought to our attention. Ever since, the institution has provided the necessary documents more quickly, which greatly facilitates the resolution process.

The institution has conducted reviews of its programs and given consideration to official language communities in the development of programs and in making changes to programs. Furthermore, in 2004, HC adopted a policy to support official language minority communities. The permanent mechanisms it has put in place, along with the consultation activities it initiated in 2000 and has continued to carry out, attest to its proactive approach in this area.

A

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 86% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 30% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 74% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 89% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 91% of cases.

The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 89% of the time, and within comparable time periods 95% of the time. 

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

The institution makes telephone and in-person inquiries periodically to check that its services are in line with its official language obligations. In light of the results of observations made by the Office of the Commissioner in 2007–2008, the institution asked its regional offices to submit plans for corrective measures, and it issued reminders to employees. To date, Health Canada National Headquarters has played an active role in monitoring service delivery in the two official languages.

Among the programs delivered by Health Canada, there is a language training program for health professionals working in areas where there are official language communities. As part of this program, Health Canada provides refresher training in the minority language concerned for health professionals working with such communities. The institution also has measures in place to develop closer ties between post-secondary education institutions in official language communities and official language minority and majority communities.

B

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 67% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 53% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfaction rates by question are presented below.

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

92%

78%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

34%

54%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

35%

55%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

75%

71%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

18%

76%

To promote the use of the two official languages in the workplace and the language retention of the second language, the institution uses its national and regional information bulletins to share best practices, tools, and facts about staff composition, from a linguistic standpoint.

D

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 2.5% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 26.6% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 5.2% of the workforce is Anglophone. 

(Source : Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

E

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The Official Language Community Development Bureau plays a very active role in initiatives designed to enhance the vitality of official language communities and advance the equality of status of the English and French languages in Canadian society. In 2001, HC took steps to identify official language communities and it held its first consultations to identify community needs, with a view to better matching its programs and services to those needs.

In addition to holding regional consultation meetings annually, the institution supports health-related studies, such as the Health Profile of French-Speaking Minority Communities in Canada and the Health Profile of English-Speaking Minority Communities in Quebec—studies carried out in partnership with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Réseau de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la santé des francophones en contexte minoritaire au Canada.

Also, in November 2009, the institution organized the first symposium ever held in Canada on the health of official language communities. The symposium dealt with various aspects pertaining to the health of members of these communities, including trends and social factors related to changes in official language communities, access to health services, teaching of health sciences at official language minority institutions, health human resources and working in official language communities and with members of these communities.

Within HC, the Official Language Community Development Bureau has good visibility and it gives presentations and information sessions to program directors. It also takes part in program planning activities since it serves on various internal planning and consultation committees.

The institution implements positive measures at various levels, in keeping with the needs expressed by official language communities. It also takes action at various levels with respect to the delivery of health services and the training of health professionals, across Canada and at all levels of study. Moreover, it supported the creation of the Société Santé en français health network, which comprises a number of health associations and other groups. The institution’s involvement in network projects has a direct influence on the benefits of health services. For example, the network in Ontario is now among the minority language health entities consulted by the provincial Ministry of Health.

A

Overall Rating

C

 
Industry Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Industry Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

Industry Canada is currently developing an action plan on official languages for the 2010–2013 period. This will be the first time that the Department will have such a plan for all sectors and branches with respect to parts IV, V and VI of the Official Languages Act (the Act). At the moment, official languages are a component of the sectors’ strategic human resources plans for 2008–2011. All sectors and branches prepared their plans using a template that sets out, among other things, the four key departmental objectives. These plans are posted on Industry Canada’s intranet site and are updated annually by the authors. Every year, the Official Languages Unit of the Human Resources Branch collects each sector’s and each branch’s plan to determine its priorities, establish its work plan and conduct an audit on certain commitments.

In 2009–2010, the Human Resources Branch developed a document containing a series of questions related to the requirements for human resources reports, including official languages, to analyze the progress made with respect to the sectors’ human resources plans. A number of initiatives have been put in place to meet the various criteria related to official languages.

It has been noted that certain departmental objectives specifically target the concerns or recommendations set out by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, especially with reference to the active offer. Industry Canada has performed an audit on the active offer of its public services and has adopted an action plan to address the issues identified and the results of observations made by the Office of the Commissioner in its 2007–2008 report card for the Department. Tools on active offer and service standards have been developed and distributed throughout the Department.

During our discussions with representatives of the institution, we learned that the follow-up on the implementation and the communication of the results achieved with the official languages action plans have not been discussed formally at the Senior Management Committee since 2008. Instead, issues relating to parts IV, V and VI of the Act are brought to the attention of the Strategic Human Resources Management Committee, which is chaired by the Director General of Human Resources. It has been difficult for the Office of the Commissioner to get an overall picture of activities that result from key departmental objectives and of activities conducted on the basis of the latter. We strongly encourage the Department to complete its integrated Action Plan for Official Languages, which is currently in the consultation phase, as soon as possible, as it will spur discussion and decision-making within the Senior Management Committee and will more clearly demonstrate the members’ monitoring and follow-up activities.

Industry Canada has an action plan for 2008–2013 for the implementation of Part VII of the Act for the Department’s programs and the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) of the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013.

Industry Canada usually cooperates well with employees of the Office of the Commissioner to resolve complaints. While the institution has had difficulties in providing the Office of the Commissioner with the requested documentation within a reasonable time frame in the last year, we can confirm that the situation has improved and that Industry Canada representatives have cooperated well with our office since January 2010.

B

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 87% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 40% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 73% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 81% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 74% of cases.

The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 80% of the time, and within comparable time periods 20% of the time.

Industry Canada hired an independent firm to conduct an audit on active offer in person and on the telephone in nearly half of its designated bilingual offices across Canada. The results were submitted to the organization’s sectors’ management committees and to the Strategic Human Resources Management Committee. An action plan was developed to fill the gaps identified within the framework of this exercise. Presentations have been made and promotional tools have been developed and distributed to all employees. An e-mail was also sent to assistant deputy ministers and equivalents to remind them of their obligations and of departmental expectations regarding active offer, and to ask them to inform their employees. Each member of senior management was provided with a sample e-mail to the attention of employees and with promotional tools.

It has also been noted that Industry Canada has established a working committee to implement the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision on the CALDECH case (DesRochers v. Canada (Industry)). The committee is to consider the legal implications of the decision on the Department’s programs, due diligence and risk management, and must also work on raising awareness of substantive equality. An initial presentation was made to the Strategic Human Resources Management Committee to make them aware of the implications of the Court’s decision. Given that the decision was rendered in February 2009, the Office of the Commissioner encourages Industry Canada to pursue the work of its committee to ensure that employees at all levels are aware of the implications of the decision on their activities. This is especially important given that the Department took part in the development of the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid intended to assist institutions in reviewing their services and programs.

D

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 75% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 64% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

78%

81%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

66%

59%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

34%

64%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

79%

84%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

57%

84%

The results of the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey show a very slight increase in the rate of satisfaction of Francophone employees working in the bilingual regions of Ontario, New Brunswick and the National Capital Region. Guidelines on the language of work were published by Industry Canada in the summer of 2009. This document, which applies to all managers and employees of the Department, consists of answers to frequently asked questions and brief explanations to clarify the rights and obligations of supervisors and employees on a range of topics dealing with language of work. Senior management has distributed the guidelines to all managers and has requested that they discuss it with their staff. The Official Languages Unit has made several presentations to management teams. One presentation on official languages is on the agenda of the mandatory orientation session for all new employees, and is offered every six to eight weeks, depending on demand.

Also, the Official Languages Unit of the Human Resources Branch regularly publishes articles in This Week@IC, the departmental electronic newsletter distributed to all employees. Proposed articles cover a variety of topics related to official languages such as active offer, bilingual meetings, and on other official-language issues such as la francophonie and the 40th anniversary of the Act.

Language training is offered to maintain acquired knowledge and for career advancement.

As for the satisfaction of Anglophone employees in bilingual regions of Quebec, the survey results show great dissatisfaction in communicating in the language of choice with supervisors. To our knowledge, no specific measures have been taken to improve this particular situation. However, Industry Canada did put in place language of work guidelines that apply to all managers and employees of the Department and continues to promote these tools.

D

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 10.3% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 41.4% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 6.1% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

D

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

Industry Canada has identified official language minority communities and commissioned an update of its 2001 socio‑economic analysis of those communities, based on 2006 census data. The final report was shared with government partners and will be disseminated to the communities in question. The Office of the Commissioner considers this research to be an important reference tool and encourages Industry Canada to disseminate it as widely as possible.

Informal consultations with officials of national organizations were held in 2009 to collect information specifically on the needs of official language communities. Consultations with local, regional and provincial organizations have also taken place, including over 100 informal consultations regarding the Economic Development Initiative (EDI). Formal and informal consultations are ongoing as the economic development programs delivered in Northern Ontario are accessible to official language communities. Up-to-date and relevant information regarding programs is shared with official language communities through presentations and consultations.

In order to promote a better understanding of the application of the Act in programs and services within FedNor, an internal policy was developed to ensure employees give consideration to the Act when reviewing funding applications. This internal policy was shared with regional development agencies as a best practice example.

Roadmap to Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013

As part of its mandate under the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) contained in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013, Industry Canada commissioned a study on Francophone entrepreneurs to support research conducted by the Department under the 2008–2013 action plan and the EDI. The Department and the regional development agencies need to increase their knowledge of small and medium-sized enterprises operating in official language communities. Industry Canada also consults Northern Ontario associations and the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité to identify needs and to determine common economic development objectives.

The Department, in collaboration with EDI partners, developed a five-year research plan (2008–2013) to increase the understanding of the economic issues faced by official language communities, and to help develop an economic policy framework.

To ensure that their programs contribute to the economic development of official language communities and to the promotion of both official languages, the Department developed a due diligence mechanism called the “Filter,” which ensures that, from their inception, programs address the needs of official language communities. While the Office of the Commissioner recognizes the value of the “Filter,” it encourages Industry Canada to seek ways to also assess the impact of these programs and services on official language communities after their implementation.

In 2009–2010, 21% of projects approved by FedNor (67 of 313) were of direct benefit to the Francophone community. This represents an increase of 10% from the previous year. Additional funding continues to be provided to designated bilingual Community Futures Development Corporations to encourage compliance with official language requirements.

With regard to EDI, 39 projects were approved in 2009–2010, resulting in investments of more than $2 million. For example, financial support and human resources were put forth by FedNor to assist in promoting the 2011 Jeux de la francophonie canadienne du Grand Sudbury during the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver.

B

Overall Rating

C

 
Library and Archives Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Library and Archives Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) prepared an action plan in October 2009 regarding the implementation of Parts IV, V and VII of the Official Languages Act (the Act). A number of action plans had been developed in the past prior to the 2004 merger of two predecessor institutions, The National Library and National Archives. LAC subsequently ensured that concrete actions would be taken and best practices established as regards the implementation of the Act.

The 2009–2012 action plans comprises objectives, planned activities and associated schedules aimed at ensuring or improving compliance with the Act. Most of the measures identified in the action plan have been taken or are currently being implemented. While the plan includes a range of measures designed to allow LAC to fulfill its official languages obligations, LAC would be well advised to take a more strategic, expanded approach to better integrate official languages into its activity planning processes. LAC is also advised to implement a mechanism for monitoring any progress achieved.

LAC is not required to submit a status report to Canadian Heritage regarding its action plan for implementing section 41 of the Act. However, LAC should step up its efforts to include the development of official language minority communities as well as the promotion of linguistic duality within these communities in its action plan. LAC has pledged to develop a more detailed action plan regarding the implementation of Part VII of the Act during 2010.

LAC’s Official Languages Champion is a member of the Council of the Network of Official Languages Champions, a forum that works within the public service to advance official languages issues. Members meet several times yearly to offer advice and guidance and to promote communication and discussion on best practices.

For the evaluation period, we have had not had to process any complaints related to LAC.

LAC has yet to establish any tools to address the potential impact of important decisions (e.g. the addition or elimination of policies or programs) on official language communities and on the promotion of linguistic duality.

LAC intends to consider the official language communities and the promotion of linguistic duality once all of its policies have been renewed, an exercise that began in May 2010.

D

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 100% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 56% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 100% of cases.

According to the Office of the Commissioner’s observations of telephone service made between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 100% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 100% of cases.

The results of the observations regarding service by e-mail made by the Office of the Commissioner confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 88% of the time, and within comparable time periods 30% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that the consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

With the exception of the active offer of service, the results of the observations are good. However, we noted that LAC has not implemented any measures to take the needs of official language communities into consideration in delivering its public service programs. 

As LAC is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures that allow it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. LAC would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid, developed to help institutions review their services and programs.

C

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 82% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. Due to the small number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Quebec, the Office of the Commissioner was unable to use the survey results in this assessment.

Satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

83%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

68%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

79%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

91%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

N/A

86%

LAC has a second-language training program for employees that is intended to allow them to develop or improve their second-language skills. In total, and according to employee needs, this in-house program has three instructors (two French instructors and one English instructor). The initiative is also expected to enhance the ability of supervisors and managers to communicate with employees in both official languages. As such, all supervisors should reach a CBC level of bilingualism, as per LAC’s 2007 Board decision to raise supervisory positions to the CBC level starting April 1, 2008.

B

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 2% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 47.8% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 0% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Information System Position and Classification System - March 2010)

E

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

LAC was made aware of the amendments to Part VII of the Act for the first time in October 2006 through presentations by Canadian Heritage. In spite of this, LAC has no permanent mechanisms in place to ensure that its strategic planning, policy planning and program development meet the obligation to enhance the vitality and support the development of English and French minority communities in Canada. Accordingly, no measures have been implemented to identify, consult or determine the needs of official language communities. LAC consults various institutions that are part of such communities in a random fashion, as illustrated by the examples below.

LAC is participating in the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie to advance the equal status and use of English and French in society.

On occasion, LAC partners with events such as Black History Month and Asian Heritage Month. It ensures that any posters it produces and distributes to the public are in both official languages and of equal quality. It also encourages associations to post information in both official languages.

LAC regularly allows the Canadian Film Institute to use its auditorium for public film screenings. The films are usually shown in English with French subtitles. As a service to the official language communities, LAC has asked Ciné Club d’Ottawa to present two films in French each month for the benefit of the Francophone minority community in the NCR.

The Ottawa International Children’s Festival is an annual celebration of excellence in the performing arts dedicated to young people. During the 2009 festival, an English-language play was scheduled, and LAC made the necessary arrangements to provide a play (Oz) in French also.

In its next action plan, LAC will identify, consult and determine the needs of official language communities in order to take positive measures accordingly.

E

Overall Rating

D

 
Natural Resources Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Natural Resources Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) has no accountability framework for official languages. What it has had, for the past three years, is an activities plan which is administered and managed by the employees’ Official Languages Working Group. The purpose of this group is essentially to promote and develop official languages and to support the efforts of both official languages champions.

The Official Languages Working Group raises the profile of official languages and promotes their associated values. In order to meet this objective, the group has developed and implemented its activities plan. It identifies the challenges, issues and risks associated with the implementation of their official language activities and it formulates recommendations to the Executive Committee on measures to be taken to improve the situation of official languages within the Department.

NRCan has not yet established a permanent mechanism that would enable it to take into account the impact of its major decisions on official language communities and on the promotion of linguistic duality. However, in the context of their Treasury Board submissions, the Department, through the use of annexes included in the process, evaluates the possible repercussions of its programs on official language minority communities.

Though NRCan has taken certain steps, it will have to intensify its efforts and actions to improve its capacity to offer quality service in both official languages at all times, to make its work environment conducive to the use of both English and French, and to further contribute to the promotion of linguistic duality and the vitality of official language communities.

NRCan representatives collaborate with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to resolve complaints.

E

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between February and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 79% of cases; an active offer by staff was made in 35% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 76% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 71% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 82% of cases.

The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e‑mail confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 100% of the time, and within comparable time periods 88% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

As required in their Treasury Board submissions, the Department evaluates the impact of its decisions on official language communities with respect to changes to their programs.  

As NRCan is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures permitting it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. NRCan would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid developed to assist institutions in reviewing their services and programs.

C

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that 72% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime.

Given the limited number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Quebec, the Office of the Commissioner was unable to use the survey results for the purposes of this evaluation.

Satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

80%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

58%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

63%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

80%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

N/A

81%

While NRCan has not put in place an action plan in response to the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey, it established some general initiatives. For example, a campaign to raise awareness of bilingual meetings was conducted in order to encourage employees to create a workplace conducive to the use of both official languages.

E

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 4.5% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 31% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 8.9% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

It should be noted that only one of the six NRCan offices in Quebec is located in a region designated as bilingual for language of work purposes.

D

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

NRCan does not have any mechanisms in place that enable it to ensure that strategic planning and policy and program development processes take into account the development of official language communities. The Department has neither identified nor consulted official language communities, but is currently considering implementing a strategy for identifying these communities.

NRCan does, however, examine the possible repercussions of implementing new programs by means of memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board submissions, federal-provincial/territorial or other agreements, bills and regulations. These submissions contain a clause pertaining to the effects on official language communities. The Department also intermittently consults official language communities in order to evaluate the potential repercussions of certain departmental activities and programs on these communities, as is currently the case in Alberta.

The Department has included the promotion of both official languages into its internal activities. For example, bilingual employees were assigned to a variety of events organized as part of the Semaine nationale de la francophonie, which took place March 15 to 19, 2010. In addition to encouraging the daily use of the French language, this week involved a host of artistic and scientific activities that took place in French, including a musical performance by Stef Paquette, a conference by Jean Lemire entitled “Voyage en Antarctique” and a francophonie rally. These activities were broadcast over the Web so employees in the regions could participate. Simultaneous translation was also available during Jean Lemire’s conference.

The measures taken constitute a first step. However, it is imperative that NRCan intensify its efforts to ensure that it plays a greater role in the development of official language communities and in the promotion of English and French.

E

Overall Rating

E

 
Passport Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Passport Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

When the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages looks at Passport Canada’s official languages achievements since the 2007–2008 report card, in which several weaknesses were identified, we do not see the desired results. We expected to be able to evaluate a detailed accountability framework, an action plan and operational accountability mechanisms. For the time being, these tools are in development and have not been put in place for the period covered in this report card. Passport Canada does not have anything finalized, but there is a draft of its Official Languages Implementation Plan pending approval by the Executive Committee.

During the 2009–2010 period, the Human Resources Bureau had a coordinator who handled language complaints in a diligent manner. Despite Passport Canada’s shortcomings in terms of an official languages action plan, the Office of the Commissioner’s complaints and follow-ups receive the necessary attention from the appropriate staff. The bilingual services advertised to the public are usually available and service agreements with third parties or partners provide for the delivery of bilingual services.

The institution uses the 2008 National Client Satisfaction Survey findings to measure performance in providing bilingual service to the public. It was last conducted in 2008 and finalized in March 2009 by an independent firm that specializes in analytics, market research and client profiles.   

At Passport Canada, an overall departmental score card must be developed to measure the achievement of official languages objectives and to present verifiable results for each part of the Official Languages Act (the Act). To date, this has not been an organizational priority. The managers’ commitment to official languages is not apparent in governance and leadership initiatives. The role and responsibilities of the Department’s Official Languages Champion are being defined and should include elements surrounding the coordination of official language activities. 

Although there was no formal accountability framework, the provisions of parts IV and V of the Act are considered when evaluating staff performance. In Passport Canada’s integrated action plan, the institution must also focus on Part VII in order to compensate for its lack of awareness of the particular needs of official language minority communities. Passport Canada did not consult these communities or take measures adapted to the specific needs of an official language minority group as a result of its lack of knowledge about these groups. 

Passport Canada must define, in concrete terms, several ways to promote linguistic duality within its organization and in Canadian society. We have not noted any measures or plans contributing to the vitality and development of official language communities for the period covered by this report card.

E

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 98% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 48% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 96% of cases. 

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 100% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 100% of cases.

Given the low response rate, the results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail will not be factored into this exercise.

The institution makes services of equal quality available to the public in both official languages but did not examine its services to the public in light of the DesRochers decision. 

B

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 84% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 95% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

95%

89%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

90%

71%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

94%

75%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

98%

93%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

98%

90%

Passport Canada has yet to develop its own policy on language of work, but measures are in place to foster the use of both official languages in bilingual regions for language of work purposes.

B

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 3.7% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 63.1% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 30.1% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position Classification Information System – March 2010)

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

Passport Canada did not identify or consult official language communities, nor did it identify their needs. It would be beneficial for the institution to have programs integrating the development of official language communities and the promotion of both official languages. The institution took no specific positive measures to foster the development of official language communities and promote equal status and use of English and French in Canadian society.

However, during the period covered by the present report card, Passport Canada planned a communications event  that began in April 2010, and invited the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada and the Quebec Community Groups Network to participate and share information with its member groups about how to participate in consultations regarding the User Fees Act. Official language communities were given the opportunity to provide feedback on Passport Canada’s services and recommend ways to improve those services.

E

Overall Rating

C

 
Public Safety Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Public Safety Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

In preparation for this report card, Public Safety Canada developed its first integrated action plan on the implementation of official languages. At the time of finalizing the report card, the plan was in draft form and not yet received senior management’s approval, although it had been reviewed by the official languages champions and members of the Departmental Committee on Official Languages.

The plan is divided according to parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Official Languages Act (the Act), and each part is relatively well developed. Its purpose is to ensure the Department’s compliance with its requirements pursuant to the Act, and therefore includes specific objectives, targeted measures and timelines. We were told that the plan was drawn up mainly to address the challenges identified in the results of the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages is pleased that activities are being planned to analyze the linguistic designation of positions for which complaints were lodged, confirming that this institution has had major problems in this regard. The Office of the Commissioner believes that Public Safety Canada will have to do more than what has been announced and conduct a thorough review of the organization of its positions at both headquarters and in the regions in order to comply with section 91 of the Act, and also provide service of equal quality in both official languages across the country.

The staff responsible for official languages was able to demonstrate that the plan is being implemented, namely by producing and sharing tools and information to promote languages of work rights and obligations, and service in both languages. The Department has also integrated an official languages component into its departmental orientation program for new employees. In addition, the Official Languages Champion sends each new employee an e-mail about their language rights and obligations on a monthly basis, reiterating the importance the Department attaches to compliance with the Act. The Department also provides employees with posters and pins that they may use to ask their colleagues to speak to them in their second official language.

The Official Languages Division produces an annual report on official languages. This tool is intended to inform the Department’s senior management of the status of official languages. The Champion, who is part of the senior management team, raises issues of interest at management committees. These issues can be related to the tools to support managers in holding bilingual meetings and promoting active offer, the Departmental launch of the DARE campaign, events such as the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act or the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie, and the progress of the Departmental Committee on Official Languages. In addition, twice in 2010, official languages were on the agenda of the Management Committee in order to discuss and approve a departmental standard CBC language profile for EX minus 1 positions.

The Office of the Commissioner has noted improved collaboration on the part of Public Safety Canada when conducting its investigations. In fact, after refusing several times in the past to implement the Office of the Commissioner’s recommendations, in January 2010, the Department agreed to change a position’s inappropriate language profile for which a complaint was lodged. In another area, Public Safety Canada reacted positively in response to the Office of the Commissioner’s proactive intervention and agreed to work towards standardizing the names of hyperlinks on its Web site in both official languages. It has also increased its use of French-language media when preparing Public Safety Canada daily infrastructure reports. 

Public Safety Canada employees responsible for preparing submissions to the Treasury Board Secretariat are required to analyze and consider any official languages issues. The analysis must determine the initiative’s impact on institutional bilingualism and the vitality and development of Anglophone and Francophone minorities in Canada, as well as the full recognition and use of both English and French in Canadian society. Authors of submissions should refer to the unit responsible for official languages at Public Safety Canada to ensure that their analysis takes into account the different parts of the Act.

C

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 84% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 48% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 75% of cases.

According to the observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner made between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 74% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 84% of cases.

The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 78% of the time, and within comparable time periods 37% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

Public Safety Canada’s ability to communicate with and serve members of official language communities in the language of their choice varies considerably across Canada. For example, in Quebec, all positions are designated bilingual, often with a C linguistic level. Elsewhere, particularly in the Anglophone provinces where minority French-language communities are located, most of the Department’s positions are designated English-essential and those designated bilingual at a B level.

In the delivery of its services, Public Safety Canada is planning initiatives for the linguistic minority. As a result, the Department was able to provide us with examples of crime prevention initiatives for the Francophone minority in Ontario and the West and for the Anglophone minority in Quebec.

As Public Safety Canada is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures permitting it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. Public Safety Canada would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid developed to assist institutions in reviewing their services and programs.

D

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 79% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. Given the limited number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Quebec, the Office of the Commissioner was unable to use the survey results for the purposes of this evaluation.

Satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

87%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

65%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

72%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

85%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

N/A

85%

The Official Languages Action Plan developed in preparation for the report card makes language of work a priority component in the official languages strategy. This contrasts with the previous plan (draft), which contained very few items on language of work.

Taking into account the difficulties that Francophones have with regard to writing and communicating with their managers in their own language, we believe that it would have been preferable to launch the information and awareness campaign on language of work sooner than spring 2011 as planned.

Meanwhile, measures are in place. Thus, the DARE campaign was launched during the Semaine nationale de la francophonie in March 2010 to encourage employees to use their second language and to improve and maintain their second-language skills. The orientation program for new employees launched in 2009 includes a component on official languages. Tools for holding bilingual meetings and bilingual communication among employees were launched in March 2010 and are available on the intranet site. Pins are available for employees to encourage co-workers to speak to them in either English or French in order to improve and maintain their second language.

C

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 11.9% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 36.4% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 17.6% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

Public Safety Canada is part of the organizing committee for the Forum du Réseau justice et sécurité sur les jeunes francophones vulnérables en situation minoritaire. Discussions to date have served to provide a better understanding of the minority population and identify their needs, thereby enabling the Department to align some of its programs, particularly in terms of the National Crime Prevention Centre.

Public Safety Canada has not yet reviewed its programs and policies to determine whether they meet their needs effectively. A review is slated to begin in fall 2010. Meanwhile, the authors of submissions to the Treasury Board must refer to the unit responsible for official languages at Public Safety Canada.

Public Safety Canada has appointed the Director, Policy, Research and Evaluation Division, National Crime Prevention Centre, to the position of departmental coordinator for the purposes of section 41 of the Act. He is also the Official Languages Co-Champion. He works closely with employees at the National Crime Prevention Centre in the regions to raise awareness of the importance of program analysis in order to understand the needs of official language communities and the impact of the programs on these communities.

As a positive measure, Public Safety Canada, through the National Crime Prevention Centre, contributed $14,373.50 to the Forum du Réseau justice et sécurité sur les jeunes francophones vulnérables en situation minoritaire held in October 2009. It is an interdepartmental forum grouping together several federal institutions.

Although the Public Safety Canada Daily Infrastructure Report posted on the Department’s Web site was in English and French, references to French-language media were virtually non‑existent until recently. Public Safety Canada staff has worked to improve the references to French-language media content now posted on the English and French versions of its site.

In the past year, the Official Languages Directorate, in collaboration with the official languages champions have promoted a series of activities such as the Journée de la Francophonie, where official languages were promoted within the institution. During the United Way’s Government of Canada Workplace Charitable Campaign, employees could pay 50 cents to express their recognition to a co-worker in their second language. This activity takes place four times a year, at Christmas, during National Public Service Week, at Halloween and during the Rendez-vous de la Francophonie. In March 2010, the DARE campaign marked the start of the Department’s official languages awareness campaign. As part of the campaign, employees were even invited to devote a few hours of their time to do volunteer work with an official language community group in their second language. 

Public Safety Canada’s regional office in Toronto is holding sessions where employees are invited to practice their second official language.

E

Overall Rating

C

 
Public Service Commission
2009-2010 Report Card
Public Service Commission of Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

The Public Service Commission (PSC) has an official languages action plan addressing all parts of the Official Languages Act (the Act). However, the plan has not been updated since 2007. To be effective, it should be reviewed on a yearly basis. While the plan indicates the completion of all activities identified in 2007, official languages initiatives since 2007 are not addressed.

The PSC also implemented an official languages accountability framework in 2006 to address shortcomings and better reflect its commitment under Part VII of the Act. The framework, which was reviewed in 2008, states that whenever the PSC develops or reviews policies, programs, initiatives, Treasury Board submissions and partnership agreements, it must analyze the impact of any changes stemming from such development or reviews on the promotion of linguistic duality and the development of official language minority communities. Furthermore, to ensure compliance with Part VII of the Act, director generals must consider official language minority community needs through measures that include the following: advertising in the minority media to provide equal access; raising awareness among employees regarding the needs of official language communities; giving official languages due consideration when undertaking program design, Treasury Board submissions and partnership agreements; and incorporating official language requirements into policy development and program implementation. The framework is available to employees on the PSC’s intranet site. The PSC has indicated that it will review its official languages accountability framework in 2010–2011.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages is encouraged by the PSC’s efforts regarding Part VII of the Act, but would like to point out that, since media advertising is actually part of Part IV of the Act (service to the public), it cannot be considered a Part VII measure.

The PSC’s official language objectives are outlined in its Report on Plans and Priorities. Results are summarized in the organization’s Performance Report and Annual Report.

The PSC has indicated that, in 2009–2010, updates to the Official Languages Program were provided to the Executive Management Committee by the Vice-President, Corporate Management Branch and the Official Languages Champion. This Committee meets on a weekly basis; official languages are addressed during the round table discussions.

The PSC promptly provides documentation related to complaints processing. The Office of the Commissioner has direct access to PSC managers for any questions or clarifications.

C

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 98% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 52% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 97% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 86% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 82% of cases. 

The results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail confirm that service in the official language of choice is available 75% of the time, and within comparable time periods 41% of the time.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that the consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the minority receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

The importance of official languages as well as public and employee rights are regularly communicated to PSC staff through the organization’s internal newsletter, Update at the PSC. Information on official languages is also available to employees on the PSC intranet site.

As the PSC is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures that allow it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. The PSC would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid, developed to help institutions review their services and programs.

C

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 87% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 85% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

83%

93%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

73%

70%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

77%

86%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

92%

91%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

100%

92%

The PSC has indicated that, since its existing mechanisms are adequate to ensure compliance with official language obligations and rights, no specific measures have been undertaken to address shortfalls.

To ensure compliance with official languages obligations throughout the organization, PSC employee performance and learning agreements include commitments with respect to second language acquisition and maintenance. Senior management, in their accountability contracts, also commit to effectively managing human resources, including maximizing the flexibilities inherent to the Public Service Employment Act when considering human resources’ impact on business decisions, staffing plans and strategies, employment equity, official languages and succession planning.

In 2009–2010, the PSC offered its employees non-statutory language training, in which 200 employees participated. The PSC’s new employee orientation course will be reviewed in 2010–2011 and an official languages complement added.

The Office of the Commissioner also found that the PSC’s Employee Engagement Survey (October 2009) lacked an official languages section and failed to address the issue.

C

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, the workforce is 21.6% Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, the workforce is 60% Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, the workforce is 30.8% Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The PSC is open to new opportunities for taking positive measures and consulting with official language communities. However, given its mandate, the PSC has planned no additional specific activities.

The PSC seeks out opportunities to work with official language communities by participating in conferences and federal councils across the country. However, it does not have a list of official language communities, nor is it clear that the PSC consults with these communities on a regular basis or understands their needs.

While the PSC has undertaken initiatives that support Part VII of the Act, the initiatives do not appear to be coordinated or systemic. A more organized approach would be useful for monitoring official language communities and their needs. The PSC gave the following as examples of their efforts to develop official language communities and promote linguistic duality.

The PSC’s Atlantic Region collaborated with Université Sainte-Anne (Nova Scotia) in a two-year pilot project to develop a second-language training program. The PSC provided language-testing services to ensure that the training met federal official language requirements. The pilot was successful; as a result, the Canada School of Public Service (the School) implemented its own pilot initiative on second-language training, a three-year program that has been expanded to include 10 universities across the country. In partnership with the School and the participating universities, the PSC continues to provide language-testing services to students in these programs.

The PSC’s Central and Southern Ontario region worked with Glendon College in Toronto to promote internship opportunities for bilingual students in the college’s Masters of Public International Affairs program. It also supports bilingualism through participation at Greater Toronto Area Job Fairs.

D

Overall Rating

C

 
Public Works and Government Services Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Public Works and Government Services Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) has developed an official languages strategic action plan for 2008–2010, a branch and region achievement spreadsheet for 2009–2010, and a detailed action plan for the implementation of Part VII, section 41 of the Official Languages Act (the Act) for 2008–2011. These documents detail specific objectives and activities, as well as the timelines and the branches/regions responsible for carrying them out. During the preparation of the Part VII plan, the Department reviewed all policies, programs and services associated with the implementation of section 41 of the Act, and indicated four objectives taken from the Results-based Management and Accountability Framework for the Official Languages Program.

The Department has maintained the secretariat it created in 2007 to handle the implementation of section 41 of the Act. In June 2009, the Human Resources Branch received authorization to create and staff three positions, for an indefinite amount of time, to oversee the promotion of linguistic duality in the Department’s major decisions and evaluate their impact.

The Department has continued to maintain its official language governance with the Official Languages Governance Committee. The annual reviews and action plans are discussed and approved by the Committee before being submitted to the Deputy Minister’s Management Committee (formerly the Department Corporate Policy Committee), which consists of members of senior management and is chaired by the Deputy Minister. The Deputy Minister’s Management Committee regularly addresses issues surrounding official languages and the monitoring of Official Languages Program implementation. The Department also shares the quarterly complaint reports prepared by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages through the Human Resources Assistant Deputy Minister’s Balanced Scorecard and that of the Deputy Minister. 

The Department’s action plan incorporates the shortcomings addressed in the Office of the Commissioner’s 2007–2008 report card, as well as the recommendations stemming from the Office of the Commissioner’s 2005 audit and 2008 follow-up report on PWGSC's management of the Official Languages Program. For example, PWGSC’s 2007–2008 report card indicated that the Department was launching a review of the language profiles of all positions. PWGSC has since completed this review and has ensured that the language profiles for all of the Department’s positions are accurate.

Through its Translation Bureau, PWGSC manages the online terminological and linguistic databank, Termium Plus. In an effort to increase linguistic awareness and accessibility, this tool is now available to all Canadians free of charge through the new Language Portal of Canada, which was launched in September 2009. The Language Portal is unique and one of PWGSC’s major initiatives.

PWGSC is committed to working with the Office of the Commissioner to resolve complaints, and cooperates fully with its employees in this regard. The Department has also been proactive with some initiatives, such as the Government Electronic Tendering Service (GETS/MERX). Since January 1, 2010, all documents published on GETS/MERX through PWGSC must be bilingual. PWGSC manages contracts with MERX, which is a business prospecting tool used to advertise and promote the Canadian public sector. New opportunities are listed daily from all levels of government, including the federal and provincial governments, as well as Canada’s MASH sector (municipal, academic, school board and hospital). The Department also consults with other government departments and industries to examine their needs in terms of technical terminology being available in both official languages on the GETS/MERX system, instead of waiting for complaints and for decisions to be made on this issue.

A

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 96% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 50% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 80% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 71% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 100% of cases.

Due to a low number of data received, the results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail will not be factored into this exercise.

PWGSC has implemented and continues to use many tools to ensure that services of equal quality are available to the public in both official languages and that it considers the needs of official language communities. In order to provide a better understanding of official language realities and provide better service to the public, PWGSC distributes information tools such as the Dialogue newsletter, informative e-mails, the Within Reach newsletter, regional official languages Web sites and official languages memory aids. In addition to this, communication tools are even distributed within the Department, such as Bulletin 41-42 and articles taken from monthly official language community newsletters. In order to continue to put in place measures permitting it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public, it would be beneficial for PWGSC to use the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid developed to help institutions to review their services and programs.

B

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that 81% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 78% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

95%

88%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

73%

68%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

68%

74%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

79%

88%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

72%

89%

PWGSC provides information sessions on official languages to new employees and awareness sessions to senior executives and managers that focus primarily on creating a workplace that is conducive to the use of both official languages and designating the language profile of positions. As in the past, the Department’s official languages champions issued reminders to employees encouraging them to participate in the language of work survey.

Based on the language of work survey results, PWGSC has held round table discussions at management meetings, town hall meetings for all employees and group discussions within branches and regions. They have also shown all employees a video on official languages and prepared a well-received In the know information capsule that was also distributed to all employees.

PWGSC evaluates the impact of these measures based on the number and nature of complaints received, the number of hits on the official languages intranet site and In the Know pieces, which are published every Thursday. It also looks at increases in the number of requests directly related to topics highlighted in In the Know pieces.

B

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 17.9% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 55.9% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, outside the NCR, 4.9% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

PWGSC continues to support human resource development within the English-speaking community in Quebec by ensuring that its recruitment campaigns are active in English-language universities and it has also participated in activities of the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation (formerly known as the Community Table) to recruit for certain programs.

D

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

Consultation mechanisms were implemented to help identify the needs and mandates of official language minority communities. As described in the Program Management section of this report card, an Official Language Minority Communities Secretariat is in place to handle matters relating to the implementation of section 41 of the Act. The Secretariat has established informal consultation mechanisms to understand the concerns and needs of official language communities dependent on PWGSC’s services. PWGSC deals mainly with four national organizations that assist in disseminating information to official language communities across the country. The Secretariat also works closely with the Champion of Official Languages for the promotion of linguistic duality and the vitality of official language minority communities, the Official Languages Governance Committee and the Part VII coordinators’ network.

The Secretariat meets regularly with community representatives, including its major community partners: the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada, the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité, the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation and the Quebec Community Groups Network. Part VII coordinators in the regions also meet periodically with representatives of official language communities (e.g., the Fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse, the Assemblée de la francophonie de l'Ontario, the Fédération des francophones de la Colombie‑Britannique, the Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta) or take part in events that increase their understanding of their needs and priorities.

Part VII coordinators (national and regional) maintain solid working relationships with other Part VII coordinators within the federal government. They discuss issues and share information and best practices.

PWGSC co-chairs the Consultative Committee on Advertising and Official Language Minority Media in order to raise government awareness about the importance of advertising within official language communities. The committee includes four official language community representatives as permanent committee members, namely the Association de la presse francophone, the Alliance des radios communautaires du Canada, the Quebec Community Newspapers Association and the Quebec Association of Anglophone Community Radio.

The Department manages an outreach program with media related to official language communities and continues the research work undertaken in 2008 on best practices for advertising in these communities. The study focuses on the application of the Official Languages Act with respect to Internet advertising based on the capabilities of official language communities. As with the outreach program, the research on best practices is ongoing and there is no end date.

The Department continues to be innovative and show leadership by organizing Linguistic Duality Week each year. The goal of this event is to raise the profile of both official languages and provide opportunities to experience bilingualism and familiarize PWGSC employees nationwide with the cultures of both official languages. Official language communities are invited to participate. Due to unforeseen circumstances this year, PWGSC had to postpone the activity to September 2010.

PWGSC is continuing with its five-year “Hotel Card” program in which more than 400 organizations representing official language communities receive hotel cards that provide access to reduced accommodation rates while travelling on business.

The Office of Small and Medium Enterprises (OSME) within PWGSC supports the access for SMEs to government contracting opportunities by reducing procurement obstacles, simplifying the contract allocation process, providing guidance to SMEs wishing to do business with the government, improving policies and best practices in procurement, and working with SMEs to ensure that their concerns are known and are taken into consideration.

The OSME has made targeted efforts by holding information sessions on how to do business with the Governement of Canada to SMEs within official language communities.

A

Overall Rating

B

 
Transport Canada
2009-2010 Report Card
Transport Canada

Official Languages Program Management (10%)

Rating

All Transport Canada regions and groups have updated action plans that include targeted and appropriate measures to address the shortcomings identified in investigations, previous report cards or audits by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. The targeted measures to correct these shortcomings are being implemented. Senior management is monitoring the situation to ensure progress is being made. Based on the progress made and shortcomings identified in each region’s and group’s progress report, the Official Languages Unit holds consultations with the National Official Languages Champion, the regional/group champions and the official languages coordinators. It recommends new departmental official languages priorities for the upcoming year. This recommendation is sent by the Director General, Human Resources, for approval by the Deputy Minister and the members of the Executive Committee. Following this approval, departmental official languages priorities are communicated to all the employees and posted on the intranet site.

Once the departmental priorities are approved, a letter is sent to all the regions and groups asking them to prepare a progress report and an annual action plan. The approved action plans are posted on the Transport Canada intranet site. The progress reports are then compiled to complete the annual review that is submitted to the Treasury Board. The annual review is sent to all members of Transport Canada’s Executive Management Committee, and a message on the intranet site encourages executives and heads to consult the document.

In addition, managers must fill out a departmental self-assessment guide for all parts of the Official Languages Act (the Act) and the progress report on service to the public. The managers take appropriate measures based on this self-assessment to correct or improve the situation. Their action plan of measurable activities is integrated into the region’s or group’s action plan. Discussions with the various management committees will ensure that the plans are implemented and that managers are fulfilling all of their language obligations.

Transport Canada also has an official languages accountability framework, approved by members of the Executive Committee, describing the roles and responsibilities of the Deputy Minister, the Official Languages Champion, managers at all levels and employees.

To better promote official languages at Transport Canada, an official languages champion was appointed in each region and for each group in the National Capital Region, and an official languages champions committee was launched in November 2008. Transport Canada’s National Official Languages Champion chairs this new committee’s meetings and teleconferences. The champions play a leadership role in ensuring all decisions of the regional/group management committee take into account official languages obligations. They also exercise influence so their region or group can achieve exemplary performance with respect to official languages.

A new Web page was created on Transport Canada’s official languages site. It contains all the champions’ names, reference documents and minutes of the meetings and teleconferences.

Transport Canada has developed and implemented a cyclical developmental language training program in order to increase its bilingual capacity. This year, this program is offered to employees in three regions as well as headquarters. Other types of language training are also available to all employees on a national basis. Employees are encouraged to include developmental language training in their individual learning plans.

New internal procedures on identifying positions or duties have been developed by Classification and official language. These procedures were approved by management to ensure compliance with section 91 of the Act.

Guidelines are in place for resolving any official languages complaints against the Department. The manager concerned, in consultation with the Human Resources Advisor and the National Official Languages Chief determines corrective measures to take to resolve the situation and prevent it from recurring. For example, when a similar situation could potentially affect other sectors, a message is posted in TC Info to inform all employees.

A Transport Canada, Part VII advisory committee was created to provide a forum for discussion on strategic issues, develop a departmental action plan and oversee its effective implementation. In addition, committee members serve as Part VII leaders for their region or group and help operational personnel achieve the objectives of Part VII. Each region and group is represented by an executive and the committee is chaired by the National Official Languages Champion.

A

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (25%)

According to observations of in-person service made by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages between January and April 2010, an active visual offer was present in 98% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 47% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 88% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between January and April 2010, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 68% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 77% of cases.

Given the low response rate, the results of the Office of the Commissioner’s observations regarding service by e-mail will not be published or factored between January and April 2010.

In 2009, the Supreme Court of Canada, in DesRochers v. Canada (Industry) (the CALDECH case), rendered a decision stating that consultation of official language minority communities in order to identify their needs is essential to providing services to the public in both official languages. The Court decreed that equal quality of services is attained when substantive equality is achieved. Substantive equality takes into account, where necessary, the differences in characteristics and circumstances of official language communities, and provides services with distinct content or by using a different method of delivery to ensure that the official language minority community receives services of the same quality as the majority language community.

Transport Canada has greatly improved its service to the public with the introduction of three new tools addressing official languages, service to the public and language of work: guidelines, a self‑assessment and progress report and a pamphlet on service to the public. A message was sent to all Transport Canada employees to promote these tools. In an Executive Committee memo, the Deputy Minister and the Department’s Official Languages Champion introduced these new tools and asked for the self-assessment and progress report to be completed quarterly by all managers of designated bilingual offices to assess service to the public and active offer compliance. The Department’s Official Languages Unit created a quarterly report that shows the bilingual capacity of all the offices. Anomalies are identified and brought to managers’ attention so appropriate corrective measures can be taken.  

In February of 2008 and 2009, the Department’s Official Languages Unit conducted a telephone audit of service to the public at all its bilingual points of service. These calls were also used to verify the addresses of the points of service and make any necessary changes to Burolis.

During 2010, the Department’s regional offices conducted telephone and in-person audits, and the Office of the Commissioner conducted an audit as well. Transport Canada plans to conduct another national telephone audit in 2011.

As Transport Canada is subject to Part IV of the Act, it must put in place measures permitting it to achieve substantive equality when providing services to the public. Transport Canada would benefit from using the Treasury Board Secretariat’s Analytical Grid developed to assist institutions in reviewing their services and programs.

B

Language of Work Part V of the Official Languages Act (30%)

The results of bilingual regions in the 2008 Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 75% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region, New Brunswick and bilingual regions of Ontario “strongly agreed” or “mostly agreed” with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 66% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, satisfaction rates by question are presented below. 

Survey questions Anglophone respondents Francophone respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

71%

84%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

51%

63%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

55%

65%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

81%

78%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

68%

84%

The Official Languages Unit at headquarters works very hard to promote official languages in terms of employees’ rights and the obligations of a federal institution in a bilingual region. The Unit’s visibility, through its many presentations, meetings, articles and booths, ensures that employees know where to go when they have questions about official languages. More and more questions are now being asked by employees in relation to language of work (when starting new projects with new work teams, for Web sites, blogs, conferences, meetings, etc.).

Various measures exist to facilitate the use of both official languages in the workplace. For instance, there were “Parlons français” days in both the National Capital Region and the Atlantic Region, as well as weekly “Conversation Wednesdays” in the Atlantic Region.

The official languages Web site is continually updated. For example, two new pages have been added, including the “OLLO Corner”, which contains all articles for employees and managers, and a directory of forms and templates for regional official languages coordinators and staffing advisors. Several tools have also been posted on the official languages intranet site for employees (language training and evaluation, workshops on chairing and participating in bilingual meetings, etc.).

B

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

The Francophone population outside Quebec and the National Capital Region (NCR) represents 4.2% of the total population.

In all of Canada, with the exception of Quebec and the NCR, 5.2% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Francophone population of the NCR represents 34.9% of the total population.

In the NCR, 37.4% of the workforce is Francophone.

The Anglophone population of Quebec represents 13.4% of the total population.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, 8.1% of the workforce is Anglophone.

(Source: Position and Classification Information System – March 2010)

C

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality Part VII of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The Department has created a list of communities that have a significant linguistic minority population. Managers use this list to identify possible impacts of their programs and new initiatives on these communities. This list is available on the intranet site, and a map is featured in a pamphlet. 

The Department completed a review of its programs and services using its Program Activity Architecture to determine those that could have an impact on the promotion of both languages and the development of official language communities. After consultations with various directorates, regions and Advisory Committee members, a strategic approach along with an action plan have been validated and were to be presented to the Executive Committee for approval in August 2010. The work accomplished so far has not yielded results to demonstrate that Transport Canada has taken positive measures to foster the development of official language communities.

D

Overall Rating

C